The complement cascade as a therapeutic target in intracerebral hemorrhage

Andrew F. Ducruet, Brad E. Zacharia, Zachary L. Hickman, Bartosz T. Grobelny, Mason L. Yeh, Sergey A. Sosunov, E. Sander Connolly

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Abstract

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the second most common and deadliest form of stroke. Currently, no pharmacologic treatment strategies exist for this devastating disease. Following the initial mechanical injury suffered at hemorrhage onset, secondary brain injury proceeds through both direct cellular injury and inflammatory cascades, which trigger infiltration of granulocytes and monocytes, activation of microglia, and disruption of the blood-brain barrier with resulting cerebral edema. The complement cascade has been shown to play a central role in the pathogenesis of secondary injury following ICH, although the specific mechanisms responsible for the proximal activation of complement remain incompletely understood. Cerebral injury following cleavage of complement component 3 (C3) proceeds through parallel but interrelated pathways of anaphylatoxin-mediated inflammation and direct toxicity secondary to membrane attack complex-driven erythrocyte lysis. Complement activation also likely plays an important physiologic role in recovery following ICH. As such, a detailed understanding of the variation in functional effects of complement activation over time is critical to exploiting this target as an exciting translational strategy for intracerebral hemorrhage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)398-403
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume219
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Ducruet, A. F., Zacharia, B. E., Hickman, Z. L., Grobelny, B. T., Yeh, M. L., Sosunov, S. A., & Connolly, E. S. (2009). The complement cascade as a therapeutic target in intracerebral hemorrhage. Experimental Neurology, 219(2), 398-403. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2009.07.018