The contribution of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) warm-up segments in assessing parent-child Interactions

Jenelle R. Shanley, Larissa N. Niec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the inclusion of uncoded segments in the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System, an analogue observation of parent-child interactions. The relationships between warm-up and coded segments were assessed, as well as the segments' associations with parent ratings of parent and child behaviors. Sixty-nine non-referred parent-child dyads engaged in the observation. Parents completed measures about their parenting and children's behaviors. Significant differences were observed between the first situation's warm-up and coded segments, whereas minimal differences were found for the second situation. Findings suggest that the second warm-up segment may not be necessary for optimal assessment of parent-child interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-263
Number of pages16
JournalChild and Family Behavior Therapy
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

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coding
parents
Child Behavior
interaction
Observation
Parenting
Parents
dyad
rating
inclusion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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