The Cultural Influences on Help-seeking Among a National Sample of Victimized Latino Women

Chiara Sabina, Carlos A. Cuevas, Jennifer L. Schally

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study examined the influence of legal status and cultural variables (i. e., acculturation, gender role ideology and religious coping) on the formal and informal help-seeking efforts of Latino women who experienced interpersonal victimization. The sample was drawn from the Sexual Assault Among Latinas (SALAS) Study that surveyed 2,000 self-identified adult Latino women. The random digit dial methodology employed in high-density Latino neighborhoods resulted in a cooperation rate of 53. 7%. Women who experienced lifetime victimization (n = 714) reported help-seeking efforts in response to their most distressful victimization event that occurred in the US. Approximately one-third of the women reported formal help-seeking and about 70% of women reported informal help-seeking. Help-seeking responses were generally not predicted by the cultural factors measured, with some exceptions. Anglo orientation and negative religious coping increased the likelihood of formal help-seeking. Positive religious coping, masculine gender role and Anglo acculturation increased the likelihood of specific forms of informal help-seeking. Latino orientation decreased the likelihood of talking to a sibling. Overall, these findings reinforce the importance of bilingual culturally competent services as cultural factors shape the ways in which women respond to victimization either formally or within their social networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-363
Number of pages17
JournalAmerican Journal of Community Psychology
Volume49
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Crime Victims
victimization
Acculturation
coping
acculturation
cultural factors
gender role
legal status
Jurisprudence
assault
Social Support
Siblings
social network
ideology
event
methodology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Sabina, Chiara ; Cuevas, Carlos A. ; Schally, Jennifer L. / The Cultural Influences on Help-seeking Among a National Sample of Victimized Latino Women. In: American Journal of Community Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 49, No. 3-4. pp. 347-363.
@article{e9bd983e0b0347aba5944737a02e3e9f,
title = "The Cultural Influences on Help-seeking Among a National Sample of Victimized Latino Women",
abstract = "The current study examined the influence of legal status and cultural variables (i. e., acculturation, gender role ideology and religious coping) on the formal and informal help-seeking efforts of Latino women who experienced interpersonal victimization. The sample was drawn from the Sexual Assault Among Latinas (SALAS) Study that surveyed 2,000 self-identified adult Latino women. The random digit dial methodology employed in high-density Latino neighborhoods resulted in a cooperation rate of 53. 7{\%}. Women who experienced lifetime victimization (n = 714) reported help-seeking efforts in response to their most distressful victimization event that occurred in the US. Approximately one-third of the women reported formal help-seeking and about 70{\%} of women reported informal help-seeking. Help-seeking responses were generally not predicted by the cultural factors measured, with some exceptions. Anglo orientation and negative religious coping increased the likelihood of formal help-seeking. Positive religious coping, masculine gender role and Anglo acculturation increased the likelihood of specific forms of informal help-seeking. Latino orientation decreased the likelihood of talking to a sibling. Overall, these findings reinforce the importance of bilingual culturally competent services as cultural factors shape the ways in which women respond to victimization either formally or within their social networks.",
author = "Chiara Sabina and Cuevas, {Carlos A.} and Schally, {Jennifer L.}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10464-011-9462-x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "347--363",
journal = "American Journal of Community Psychology",
issn = "0091-0562",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3-4",

}

The Cultural Influences on Help-seeking Among a National Sample of Victimized Latino Women. / Sabina, Chiara; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Schally, Jennifer L.

In: American Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 49, No. 3-4, 01.01.2012, p. 347-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Cultural Influences on Help-seeking Among a National Sample of Victimized Latino Women

AU - Sabina, Chiara

AU - Cuevas, Carlos A.

AU - Schally, Jennifer L.

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - The current study examined the influence of legal status and cultural variables (i. e., acculturation, gender role ideology and religious coping) on the formal and informal help-seeking efforts of Latino women who experienced interpersonal victimization. The sample was drawn from the Sexual Assault Among Latinas (SALAS) Study that surveyed 2,000 self-identified adult Latino women. The random digit dial methodology employed in high-density Latino neighborhoods resulted in a cooperation rate of 53. 7%. Women who experienced lifetime victimization (n = 714) reported help-seeking efforts in response to their most distressful victimization event that occurred in the US. Approximately one-third of the women reported formal help-seeking and about 70% of women reported informal help-seeking. Help-seeking responses were generally not predicted by the cultural factors measured, with some exceptions. Anglo orientation and negative religious coping increased the likelihood of formal help-seeking. Positive religious coping, masculine gender role and Anglo acculturation increased the likelihood of specific forms of informal help-seeking. Latino orientation decreased the likelihood of talking to a sibling. Overall, these findings reinforce the importance of bilingual culturally competent services as cultural factors shape the ways in which women respond to victimization either formally or within their social networks.

AB - The current study examined the influence of legal status and cultural variables (i. e., acculturation, gender role ideology and religious coping) on the formal and informal help-seeking efforts of Latino women who experienced interpersonal victimization. The sample was drawn from the Sexual Assault Among Latinas (SALAS) Study that surveyed 2,000 self-identified adult Latino women. The random digit dial methodology employed in high-density Latino neighborhoods resulted in a cooperation rate of 53. 7%. Women who experienced lifetime victimization (n = 714) reported help-seeking efforts in response to their most distressful victimization event that occurred in the US. Approximately one-third of the women reported formal help-seeking and about 70% of women reported informal help-seeking. Help-seeking responses were generally not predicted by the cultural factors measured, with some exceptions. Anglo orientation and negative religious coping increased the likelihood of formal help-seeking. Positive religious coping, masculine gender role and Anglo acculturation increased the likelihood of specific forms of informal help-seeking. Latino orientation decreased the likelihood of talking to a sibling. Overall, these findings reinforce the importance of bilingual culturally competent services as cultural factors shape the ways in which women respond to victimization either formally or within their social networks.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84860601262&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84860601262&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10464-011-9462-x

DO - 10.1007/s10464-011-9462-x

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 347

EP - 363

JO - American Journal of Community Psychology

JF - American Journal of Community Psychology

SN - 0091-0562

IS - 3-4

ER -