The current and future roles of the small farm resource center in horticulture extension and advisory services: Lessons learned from seven case studies in SE Asia

A. J. Bicksler, Ricky M. Bates, R. R. Burnette

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Small Farm Resource Centers (SFRCs) coordinate trials on a central site as well as on fields of individual farmers. Their purpose is to evaluate, within the community, ideas that have been proven elsewhere and that show promise. SFRCs are not a new approach to agricultural development - variations on this theme have been in operation in many parts of the world for years. Yet an assessment of the regional efficacy of SFRCs is lacking. This project evaluated seven existing SFRCs in southeast Asia to illustrate the concept of the SFRC, assess outreach efficacy, and derive lessons learned. In the absence of a strong governmental or university-based extension system, SFRCs play a substantial role in smallholder farmer horticulture education and community development, particularly in reaching neglected or marginalized populations. Successful SFRCs showcase proven extension and outreach activities such as demonstrations and farmer-led cooperative research, while at the same time embracing new approaches for dealing with the unique constraints and opportunities of the locality. SFRCs represent an effective and successful agriculture and community development tool, particularly when they improve the link between local farmers and markets. To be effective, SFRCs should be sensitive to the local environment in which they operate and reflect the particular needs of the local communities. Overall, it is our opinion that SFRCs are adaptable and effective tools for meeting the changing needs of the clientele to whom they aspire to serve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture
Subtitle of host publicationSustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes, IHC 2014: International Symposium on Impact of Asia-Pacific Horticulture - Resources, Technology and Social Welfare
EditorsR. Sun, R. Tao, K.S. Kim
PublisherInternational Society for Horticultural Science
Pages111-116
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9789462611429
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 30 2016

Publication series

NameActa Horticulturae
Volume1129
ISSN (Print)0567-7572

Fingerprint

small farms
horticulture
case studies
farmers
outreach
community development
cooperative research
South East Asia
education
agriculture
markets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture

Cite this

Bicksler, A. J., Bates, R. M., & Burnette, R. R. (2016). The current and future roles of the small farm resource center in horticulture extension and advisory services: Lessons learned from seven case studies in SE Asia. In R. Sun, R. Tao, & K. S. Kim (Eds.), 29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes, IHC 2014: International Symposium on Impact of Asia-Pacific Horticulture - Resources, Technology and Social Welfare (pp. 111-116). (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 1129). International Society for Horticultural Science. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1129.16
Bicksler, A. J. ; Bates, Ricky M. ; Burnette, R. R. / The current and future roles of the small farm resource center in horticulture extension and advisory services : Lessons learned from seven case studies in SE Asia. 29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes, IHC 2014: International Symposium on Impact of Asia-Pacific Horticulture - Resources, Technology and Social Welfare. editor / R. Sun ; R. Tao ; K.S. Kim. International Society for Horticultural Science, 2016. pp. 111-116 (Acta Horticulturae).
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Bicksler, AJ, Bates, RM & Burnette, RR 2016, The current and future roles of the small farm resource center in horticulture extension and advisory services: Lessons learned from seven case studies in SE Asia. in R Sun, R Tao & KS Kim (eds), 29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes, IHC 2014: International Symposium on Impact of Asia-Pacific Horticulture - Resources, Technology and Social Welfare. Acta Horticulturae, vol. 1129, International Society for Horticultural Science, pp. 111-116. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1129.16

The current and future roles of the small farm resource center in horticulture extension and advisory services : Lessons learned from seven case studies in SE Asia. / Bicksler, A. J.; Bates, Ricky M.; Burnette, R. R.

29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes, IHC 2014: International Symposium on Impact of Asia-Pacific Horticulture - Resources, Technology and Social Welfare. ed. / R. Sun; R. Tao; K.S. Kim. International Society for Horticultural Science, 2016. p. 111-116 (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 1129).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Bicksler AJ, Bates RM, Burnette RR. The current and future roles of the small farm resource center in horticulture extension and advisory services: Lessons learned from seven case studies in SE Asia. In Sun R, Tao R, Kim KS, editors, 29th International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes, IHC 2014: International Symposium on Impact of Asia-Pacific Horticulture - Resources, Technology and Social Welfare. International Society for Horticultural Science. 2016. p. 111-116. (Acta Horticulturae). https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1129.16