The current management of hepatoblastoma

A combination of chemotherapy, conventional resection, and liver transplantation

Gregory M. Tiao, Nicola Bobey, Steven Allen, Neris Nieves, Maria Alonso, John Bucuvalas, Robert Wells, Frederick Ryckman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To review our experience in the management of children who present with hepatoblastoma. Study design: Thirty patients treated for hepatoblastoma at a single institution were reviewed. Results: Ten patients presented with stage I to stage II disease and underwent resection. Seventeen presented with stage III disease; two underwent initial resection of which one required rescue transplantation. The remaining 15 underwent biopsies, which were followed by chemotherapy. Nine patients had a reduction in tumor size and underwent conventional resection. One required rescue transplantation for residual disease. Five patients underwent primary transplantation for unresectable disease. One patient expired during chemotherapy. Three patients presented with stage IV disease and underwent biopsies, which were followed by chemotherapy. One patient responded but required "rescue" transplantation after conventional resection. Seven patients underwent aggressive conventional resection (trisegmentectomy or central liver resection); three had positive surgical margins and underwent transplantation. One developed recurrent disease. Five-year survival was 82.5% ± 7.1%. There was no operative mortality during surgical therapy. All transplant recipients were tumor free, but one died from lymphoma 7 years post-transplant. Conclusion: Chemotherapy may reduce tumor size, allowing for conventional resection. If aggressive resection is necessary or bi-lobar disease persists, primary transplantation is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-211
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume146
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Hepatoblastoma
Combination Drug Therapy
Liver Transplantation
Transplantation
Drug Therapy
Biopsy
Neoplasms
Lymphoma
Transplants
Survival
Mortality
Liver

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Tiao, Gregory M. ; Bobey, Nicola ; Allen, Steven ; Nieves, Neris ; Alonso, Maria ; Bucuvalas, John ; Wells, Robert ; Ryckman, Frederick. / The current management of hepatoblastoma : A combination of chemotherapy, conventional resection, and liver transplantation. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2005 ; Vol. 146, No. 2. pp. 204-211.
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The current management of hepatoblastoma : A combination of chemotherapy, conventional resection, and liver transplantation. / Tiao, Gregory M.; Bobey, Nicola; Allen, Steven; Nieves, Neris; Alonso, Maria; Bucuvalas, John; Wells, Robert; Ryckman, Frederick.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 146, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 204-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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