The Daily Inventory of Stressful Events: An interview-based approach for measuring daily stressors

David M. Almeida, Elaine Wethington, Ronald C. Kessler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

285 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study introduces the Daily Inventory of Stressful Events (DISE), an interview-based approach to the measurement of multiple aspects of daily stressors through daily telephone interviews. Using a U.S. national sample of adults aged 25 to 74 (N = 1031), the prevalence as well as the affective and physical correlates of daily stressors are examined. Respondents had at least one daily stressor on 40 percent of the study days and multiple stressors on 11 percent of the study days. The most common class of stressors was interpersonal tension followed by work-related stressors for men and network stressors (events that occur to close others) for women. Stressors that involved danger of loss were more prevalent than stressors in which loss actually occurred. Regression analyses showed that specific types of daily stressors such as interpersonal tensions and network stressors were unique predictors of both health symptoms and mood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-55
Number of pages15
JournalAssessment
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2002

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Almeida, David M. ; Wethington, Elaine ; Kessler, Ronald C. / The Daily Inventory of Stressful Events : An interview-based approach for measuring daily stressors. In: Assessment. 2002 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 41-55.
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The Daily Inventory of Stressful Events : An interview-based approach for measuring daily stressors. / Almeida, David M.; Wethington, Elaine; Kessler, Ronald C.

In: Assessment, Vol. 9, No. 1, 03.2002, p. 41-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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