The deconvolution of the thermal, dilution, and chemical effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the reactivity of engine and flame soot

Khalid Al-Qurashi, Angela D. Lueking, André L. Boehman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a recent paper, we demonstrated that the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) enhanced the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot. In this paper, we show that simulated EGR, via carbon dioxide (CO2) addition to the intake air to an engine at concentrations of 0, 2, 4, and 8 vol.% and to the oxidizer stream of an ethylene diffusion flame at concentrations of 0, 5, and 10vol.%, affects the reactivity of the soot in the same manner as actual EGR. Motivated by this fact, post-flame ethylene soot was produced from a co-flow laminar diffusion flame to better understand the mechanism by which the CO2 affects soot reactivity. This objective was accomplished by successfully isolating and examining the thermal, dilution, and chemical effects of the CO2 on soot reactivity. These three effects account for 45%, 35%, and 20% of the total reactivity of soot respectively, with the thermal effect being the most important factor governing the soot reactivity. The results showed that all of these effects account for a measurable increase in soot reactivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1696-1704
Number of pages9
JournalCombustion and Flame
Volume158
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Fuel Technology
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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