The diabetes healthy outcomes program

Results of free health care for uninsured at a federally qualified community health center

Rhonda Belue, M. Kathleen Figaro, Jeannine Peterson, Christina Wilds, Parnitha William

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Uninsured patients with diabetes are at increased risk for poor outcomes and often have limited access to health and prescription services necessary to manage diabetes. Hamilton Health Center, a federally qualified community health center, with support from the Highmark Foundation, implemented a Diabetes Healthy Outcomes Program (DHOP) for uninsured patients. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of DHOP that is designed to provide health care and supportive services for uninsured diabetic patients at a federally qualified community health center. Methods: Mixed quantitative and qualitative analyses of participant outcomes and satisfaction were used to assess program effectiveness. Results: A total of 189 participants enrolled in DHOP over 2 years. Thirty-four (18%) participants had adequate glycemic control with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≤7%. Overall, 105 participants received prescription drugs, 101 participants received eye care services, 23 participants received dental services, 45 received podiatry services, 37 received nutrition services, and 28 patients engaged in an exercise program. More participants (38%, 34) had controlled diabetes mellitus at study start than at the end (28%, 25). However, 30% versus 17% of participants with 2 HbA1c measurements achieved or maintained HbA1c ≤7% by the end of the program compared with the start. Participants who accessed more services were more likely to achieve glycemic control as measured by HbA1c (P >.01). Conclusion: Although 30% of participants improved or maintained glycemic control over 2 years, more were uncontrolled at the end than at study start. Participants who accessed more primary and specialty care services were more likely to achieve glycemic control. Multidisciplinary care may improve diabetes control in low-income patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-8
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Primary Care and Community Health
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Community Health Centers
Delivery of Health Care
Hemoglobins
Podiatry
Prescription Drugs
Program Evaluation
Health Services
Prescriptions
Primary Health Care
Diabetes Mellitus
Tooth
Exercise
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Community and Home Care
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Belue, Rhonda ; Kathleen Figaro, M. ; Peterson, Jeannine ; Wilds, Christina ; William, Parnitha. / The diabetes healthy outcomes program : Results of free health care for uninsured at a federally qualified community health center. In: Journal of Primary Care and Community Health. 2014 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 4-8.
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abstract = "Background: Uninsured patients with diabetes are at increased risk for poor outcomes and often have limited access to health and prescription services necessary to manage diabetes. Hamilton Health Center, a federally qualified community health center, with support from the Highmark Foundation, implemented a Diabetes Healthy Outcomes Program (DHOP) for uninsured patients. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of DHOP that is designed to provide health care and supportive services for uninsured diabetic patients at a federally qualified community health center. Methods: Mixed quantitative and qualitative analyses of participant outcomes and satisfaction were used to assess program effectiveness. Results: A total of 189 participants enrolled in DHOP over 2 years. Thirty-four (18{\%}) participants had adequate glycemic control with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≤7{\%}. Overall, 105 participants received prescription drugs, 101 participants received eye care services, 23 participants received dental services, 45 received podiatry services, 37 received nutrition services, and 28 patients engaged in an exercise program. More participants (38{\%}, 34) had controlled diabetes mellitus at study start than at the end (28{\%}, 25). However, 30{\%} versus 17{\%} of participants with 2 HbA1c measurements achieved or maintained HbA1c ≤7{\%} by the end of the program compared with the start. Participants who accessed more services were more likely to achieve glycemic control as measured by HbA1c (P >.01). Conclusion: Although 30{\%} of participants improved or maintained glycemic control over 2 years, more were uncontrolled at the end than at study start. Participants who accessed more primary and specialty care services were more likely to achieve glycemic control. Multidisciplinary care may improve diabetes control in low-income patients.",
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The diabetes healthy outcomes program : Results of free health care for uninsured at a federally qualified community health center. / Belue, Rhonda; Kathleen Figaro, M.; Peterson, Jeannine; Wilds, Christina; William, Parnitha.

In: Journal of Primary Care and Community Health, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 4-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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