The Digital Divide: its Continued Relevance

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In the United States the digital divide entered the public discourse in the mid-1990s. Over the next two decades, a number of national, regional, and local interventions were implemented to bring information and communication technologies (ICT) to populations who would otherwise go lacking in access to these resources. Some argued that these gains in broadening access to ICT suggested a closing of the digital divide and that the United States was now a nation online. However, as access increased, new and evolving divides in the quality of access, the skills to effectively use online resources, and the availability of culturally salient online content emerged. This article discusses these new and evolving divides, and argues for the continued relevance of the digital divide as an issue for policy makers, educators, researchers, and communities.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWiley Encyclopedia of Management
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd
ISBN (Print)9781118785317
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Publication series

NameWiley Encyclopedia of Management

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digital divide
communication technology
information technology
resources
educator
discourse
community

Cite this

Kvasny, L. (2015). The Digital Divide: its Continued Relevance. In Wiley Encyclopedia of Management (Wiley Encyclopedia of Management). John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118785317.weom070212
Kvasny, Lynette. / The Digital Divide: its Continued Relevance. Wiley Encyclopedia of Management. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2015. (Wiley Encyclopedia of Management).
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Kvasny, L 2015, The Digital Divide: its Continued Relevance. in Wiley Encyclopedia of Management. Wiley Encyclopedia of Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118785317.weom070212

The Digital Divide: its Continued Relevance. / Kvasny, Lynette.

Wiley Encyclopedia of Management. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2015. (Wiley Encyclopedia of Management).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Kvasny L. The Digital Divide: its Continued Relevance. In Wiley Encyclopedia of Management. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 2015. (Wiley Encyclopedia of Management). https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118785317.weom070212