The disproportionality dilemma

Patterns of teacher referrals to school counselors for disruptive behavior

Julia A. Bryan, Norma Day-Vines, Dana Griffin, Cheryl Moore-Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disproportionality plagues schools nationwide in special education placement, dropout, discipline referral, suspension, and expulsion rates. This study examined predictors of teacher referrals to school counselors for disruptive behavior in a sample of students selected from the Educational Longitudinal Study 2002 (National Center for Education Statistics, n.d.). Findings demonstrated that students' race predicted English teacher referrals; students' gender, previous disciplinary infractions, and teachers' postsecondary expectations for students predicted English and math teacher referrals. Implications for practice, policy, and research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-190
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Counseling and Development
Volume90
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Fingerprint

Referral and Consultation
Students
Special Education
Plague
Longitudinal Studies
Suspensions
Education
Counselors
Problem Behavior
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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The disproportionality dilemma : Patterns of teacher referrals to school counselors for disruptive behavior. / Bryan, Julia A.; Day-Vines, Norma; Griffin, Dana; Moore-Thomas, Cheryl.

In: Journal of Counseling and Development, Vol. 90, No. 2, 01.04.2012, p. 177-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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