The double-edged crisis: Invisible Children's social media response to the Kony 2012 campaign

Stephanie Madden, Melissa Janoske, Rowena L. Briones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using the ideas of social media activism and organizational learning to guide analysis, this paper explores Invisible Children, Inc.'s social-mediated response to the humanitarian crisis in Central and East Africa, the organizational crisis these responses created, and how the organization responded to these different types of crisis via social media. Key findings include describing their humanitarian crisis response as a "social experiment," Invisible Children's personalization of response on social media to their organizational crisis, and the increased transparency Invisible Children demonstrated during and after the crisis. The results of this study demonstrate how social media have the ability to play a key role in increasing awareness about an important humanitarian cause, yet can also threaten the reputation and legitimacy of the organization behind the social-mediated message.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-48
Number of pages11
JournalPublic Relations Review
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

social media
campaign
Transparency
organization
Central Africa
Experiments
personalization
East Africa
learning organization
reputation
transparency
Social media
legitimacy
cause
experiment
ability
Crisis response
Organizational crisis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Marketing

Cite this

@article{d42f04bd86144f4c971338d3d01fc83b,
title = "The double-edged crisis: Invisible Children's social media response to the Kony 2012 campaign",
abstract = "Using the ideas of social media activism and organizational learning to guide analysis, this paper explores Invisible Children, Inc.'s social-mediated response to the humanitarian crisis in Central and East Africa, the organizational crisis these responses created, and how the organization responded to these different types of crisis via social media. Key findings include describing their humanitarian crisis response as a {"}social experiment,{"} Invisible Children's personalization of response on social media to their organizational crisis, and the increased transparency Invisible Children demonstrated during and after the crisis. The results of this study demonstrate how social media have the ability to play a key role in increasing awareness about an important humanitarian cause, yet can also threaten the reputation and legitimacy of the organization behind the social-mediated message.",
author = "Stephanie Madden and Melissa Janoske and Briones, {Rowena L.}",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.pubrev.2015.10.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "38--48",
journal = "Public Relations Review",
issn = "0363-8111",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "1",

}

The double-edged crisis : Invisible Children's social media response to the Kony 2012 campaign. / Madden, Stephanie; Janoske, Melissa; Briones, Rowena L.

In: Public Relations Review, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 38-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The double-edged crisis

T2 - Invisible Children's social media response to the Kony 2012 campaign

AU - Madden, Stephanie

AU - Janoske, Melissa

AU - Briones, Rowena L.

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - Using the ideas of social media activism and organizational learning to guide analysis, this paper explores Invisible Children, Inc.'s social-mediated response to the humanitarian crisis in Central and East Africa, the organizational crisis these responses created, and how the organization responded to these different types of crisis via social media. Key findings include describing their humanitarian crisis response as a "social experiment," Invisible Children's personalization of response on social media to their organizational crisis, and the increased transparency Invisible Children demonstrated during and after the crisis. The results of this study demonstrate how social media have the ability to play a key role in increasing awareness about an important humanitarian cause, yet can also threaten the reputation and legitimacy of the organization behind the social-mediated message.

AB - Using the ideas of social media activism and organizational learning to guide analysis, this paper explores Invisible Children, Inc.'s social-mediated response to the humanitarian crisis in Central and East Africa, the organizational crisis these responses created, and how the organization responded to these different types of crisis via social media. Key findings include describing their humanitarian crisis response as a "social experiment," Invisible Children's personalization of response on social media to their organizational crisis, and the increased transparency Invisible Children demonstrated during and after the crisis. The results of this study demonstrate how social media have the ability to play a key role in increasing awareness about an important humanitarian cause, yet can also threaten the reputation and legitimacy of the organization behind the social-mediated message.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84958120008&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84958120008&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pubrev.2015.10.002

DO - 10.1016/j.pubrev.2015.10.002

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84958120008

VL - 42

SP - 38

EP - 48

JO - Public Relations Review

JF - Public Relations Review

SN - 0363-8111

IS - 1

ER -