The Double Standard at Sexual Debut: Gender, Sexual Behavior and Adolescent Peer Acceptance

Derek A. Kreager, Jeremy Staff, Robin Gauthier, Eva S. Lefkowitz, Mark E. Feinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A sexual double standard in adolescence has important implications for sexual development and gender inequality. The present study uses longitudinal social network data (N = 914; 11–16 years of age) to test if gender moderates associations between adolescents’ sexual behaviors and peer acceptance. Consistent with a traditional sexual double standard, female adolescents who reported having sex had significant decreases in peer acceptance over time, whereas male adolescents reporting the same behavior had significant increases in peer acceptance. This pattern was observed net of respondents’ own perceived friendships, further suggesting that the social responses to sex vary by gender of the sexual actor. However, findings for “making out” showed a reverse double standard, such that female adolescents reporting this behavior had increases in peer acceptance and male adolescents reporting the same behavior had decreases in peer acceptance over time. Results thus suggest that peers enforce traditional sexual scripts for both “heavy” and “light” sexual behaviors during adolescence. These findings have important implications for sexual health education, encouraging educators to develop curricula that emphasize the gendered social construction of sexuality and to combat inequitable and stigmatizing peer responses to real or perceived deviations from traditional sexual scripts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-392
Number of pages16
JournalSex Roles
Volume75
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Sexual Behavior
acceptance
adolescent
gender
female adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
adolescence
Sexual Development
social construction
friendship
health promotion
Reproductive Health
Sexuality
sexuality
social network
Health Education
Social Support
Curriculum
Longitudinal Studies
educator

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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The Double Standard at Sexual Debut : Gender, Sexual Behavior and Adolescent Peer Acceptance. / Kreager, Derek A.; Staff, Jeremy; Gauthier, Robin; Lefkowitz, Eva S.; Feinberg, Mark E.

In: Sex Roles, Vol. 75, No. 7-8, 01.10.2016, p. 377-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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