The Economics of Flexible Work Scheduling: Theoretical Advances and Contemporary Paradoxes

Morris Altman, Lonnie Golden

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

A theoretical economic model is developed to explain the disparities in flexible work scheduling observed across firms, workplaces, sectors, and time periods. Given heterogeneity in firms' costs, the supply of flextime is determined by firms' costs of enacting versus not adopting it. The innovative practice would be adopted if it generates net unit labor cost savings. If it is cost neutral, the extent to which the supply of flextime falls short of worker demand for it depends on the extent to which employers must accommodate employee preferences for more time sovereignty and are induced by policy incentives to switch to flexible scheduling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWorkplace Temporalities
EditorsBeth Rubin
Pages313-341
Number of pages29
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 9 2007

Publication series

NameResearch in the Sociology of Work
Volume17
ISSN (Print)0277-2833

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Altman, M., & Golden, L. (2007). The Economics of Flexible Work Scheduling: Theoretical Advances and Contemporary Paradoxes. In B. Rubin (Ed.), Workplace Temporalities (pp. 313-341). (Research in the Sociology of Work; Vol. 17). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0277-2833(07)17010-2