The effect of accidents on labor market outcomes: Evidence from Chile

Francisco Parro, R. Vincent Pohl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We estimate the causal effect of accidents on employment and earnings among Chilean men using event study methods and monthly administrative data. An accident of any type reduces the probability of being employed by 8.4 percentage points in the first year, by 11.2 percentage points in the second year, and by 14.8 percentage points in the third year after the accident. On average, over the three years after the accident, employment declines by 14%, relative to the pre-accident mean. In addition, accidents reduce monthly earnings by around 11% in the first year, 17% in the second year, and 22% in the third year after the accident. On average, monthly earnings fall by 16%, relative to the pre-accident average. Thus, we estimate persistent and increasing labor market effects of accidents over time. These effects vary by individuals' age, education, and industry and by severity of the accident. Our findings imply that the economic consequences of health shocks go beyond direct medical expenses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Economics (United Kingdom)
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

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