The effect of aided AAC modeling on the expression of multi-symbol messages by preschoolers who use AAC

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Abstract

A single subject, multiple probe design across participants was used to evaluate the impact of using aided AAC modeling to support multi-symbol message production. Five preschoolers (three who used voice output communication systems, two who used non-electronic communication boards) participated in the study. Aided AAC models were provided by pointing to two symbols on the child's aided AAC system and then providing a grammatically complete spoken model while engaging in play activities. Four of the five preschoolers learned to consistently produce multi-symbol messages; the fifth did not demonstrate consistent gains. The four preschoolers who met criterion all evidenced long-term use of symbol combinations and generalized use of symbol combinations to novel play routines. Results, clinical implications, and future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-43
Number of pages14
JournalAAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 29 2007

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Communication Aids for Disabled
Communication
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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