The effect of cooperative listening exercises on the critical listening skills of college music-appreciation students

Thomas Smialek, Renee Reiter Boburka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors investigated the effectiveness of cooperative listening exercises in developing critical music-listening skills in nonmusic majors. Subjects were college freshmen and sophomores enrolled in Introduction to Western Music. Control-group subjects attended classes taught exclusively in lecture format. Two experimental groups participated in four 50-minute group-listening exercises. Experimental Group 2 engaged in five additional group-analysis exercises, comparing known and unfamiliar musical styles. The consistent use of cooperative-listening exercises proved to be more effective in developing subjects' critical listening skills than either lecture-demonstration or occasional group work. On final exams, Experimental Group 2 scored significantly better than the other groups on identifications of texture, compositional genre, and musical style. To be most effective, group work needs to be implemented on a regular basis-for both the introduction of new material and for its review or application.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-72
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Research in Music Education
Volume54
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Fingerprint

music
Group
student
group work
Exercise
Music
genre
Experimental Group
Musical Style

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Music

Cite this

@article{3fd950d0eb134e1284c9d3904a98334d,
title = "The effect of cooperative listening exercises on the critical listening skills of college music-appreciation students",
abstract = "The authors investigated the effectiveness of cooperative listening exercises in developing critical music-listening skills in nonmusic majors. Subjects were college freshmen and sophomores enrolled in Introduction to Western Music. Control-group subjects attended classes taught exclusively in lecture format. Two experimental groups participated in four 50-minute group-listening exercises. Experimental Group 2 engaged in five additional group-analysis exercises, comparing known and unfamiliar musical styles. The consistent use of cooperative-listening exercises proved to be more effective in developing subjects' critical listening skills than either lecture-demonstration or occasional group work. On final exams, Experimental Group 2 scored significantly better than the other groups on identifications of texture, compositional genre, and musical style. To be most effective, group work needs to be implemented on a regular basis-for both the introduction of new material and for its review or application.",
author = "Thomas Smialek and Boburka, {Renee Reiter}",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "57--72",
journal = "Journal of Research in Music Education",
issn = "0022-4294",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

The effect of cooperative listening exercises on the critical listening skills of college music-appreciation students. / Smialek, Thomas; Boburka, Renee Reiter.

In: Journal of Research in Music Education, Vol. 54, No. 1, 01.12.2006, p. 57-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of cooperative listening exercises on the critical listening skills of college music-appreciation students

AU - Smialek, Thomas

AU - Boburka, Renee Reiter

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - The authors investigated the effectiveness of cooperative listening exercises in developing critical music-listening skills in nonmusic majors. Subjects were college freshmen and sophomores enrolled in Introduction to Western Music. Control-group subjects attended classes taught exclusively in lecture format. Two experimental groups participated in four 50-minute group-listening exercises. Experimental Group 2 engaged in five additional group-analysis exercises, comparing known and unfamiliar musical styles. The consistent use of cooperative-listening exercises proved to be more effective in developing subjects' critical listening skills than either lecture-demonstration or occasional group work. On final exams, Experimental Group 2 scored significantly better than the other groups on identifications of texture, compositional genre, and musical style. To be most effective, group work needs to be implemented on a regular basis-for both the introduction of new material and for its review or application.

AB - The authors investigated the effectiveness of cooperative listening exercises in developing critical music-listening skills in nonmusic majors. Subjects were college freshmen and sophomores enrolled in Introduction to Western Music. Control-group subjects attended classes taught exclusively in lecture format. Two experimental groups participated in four 50-minute group-listening exercises. Experimental Group 2 engaged in five additional group-analysis exercises, comparing known and unfamiliar musical styles. The consistent use of cooperative-listening exercises proved to be more effective in developing subjects' critical listening skills than either lecture-demonstration or occasional group work. On final exams, Experimental Group 2 scored significantly better than the other groups on identifications of texture, compositional genre, and musical style. To be most effective, group work needs to be implemented on a regular basis-for both the introduction of new material and for its review or application.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=61249182126&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=61249182126&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:61249182126

VL - 54

SP - 57

EP - 72

JO - Journal of Research in Music Education

JF - Journal of Research in Music Education

SN - 0022-4294

IS - 1

ER -