The effect of early childhood intervention and subsequent special education services: Findings from the Chicago child-parent centers

Liza M. Conyers, Arthur J. Reynolds, Suh Ruu Ou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores patterns of special education services during the elementary grades among children who participated in either the Child-Parent Center (CPC) Preschool Program or other early childhood programs in the Chicago Public Schools. The study sample included 1,377 low-income, racial minority children in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. Controlling for family background characteristics that might affect educational performance, children who participated in Child-Parent Center preschool had a significantly lower rate of special education placement (12.5%) than the comparison group (18.4%), who participated in an alternative all-day kindergarten program. The estimated impact of CPC preschool intervention was best explained by the cognitive advantage hypothesis. This article provides support for the long-term impact of the CPC preschool intervention on special education outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-95
Number of pages21
JournalEducational Evaluation and Policy Analysis
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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special education
parents
childhood
kindergarten
longitudinal study
low income
school grade
minority
school
performance
Group

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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The effect of early childhood intervention and subsequent special education services : Findings from the Chicago child-parent centers. / Conyers, Liza M.; Reynolds, Arthur J.; Ou, Suh Ruu.

In: Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 75-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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