The Effect of Five Proofreading Conditions on the Spelling Performance of College Students with Learning Disabilities

David McNaughton, Charles Hughes, Karen Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of five proofreading conditions on the spelling performance of 12 college students with learning disabilities on a composition activity. The proofreading conditions investigated were handwriting with no additional assistance, handwriting with a conventional print dictionary, handwriting with a handheld spelling checker, word processing with no additional assistance, and word processing with an integrated spelling checker. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze the results, with proofreading condition used as a within-participants factor. Except for handwriting alone, all of the techniques resulted in significant reductions in the number of spelling errors in the students' written work; however, none of the techniques enabled the students to produce compositions with a mean level of spelling accuracy comparable to that of their nondisabled peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)643-651
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Learning Disabilities
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

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