The effect of fruit in different forms on energy intake and satiety at a meal

Julie E. Flood-Obbagy, Barbara J. Rolls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

170 Scopus citations

Abstract

Consuming whole fruit reduces ratings of satiety more than fruit juice, but little is known about the effects of different forms of fruit on subsequent energy intake. This study tested how consuming preloads of apples in different forms prior to a meal (apple, applesauce, and apple juice with and without added fiber) influences satiety and energy intake at meal. Preloads were matched for weight, energy content, energy density, and ingestion rate. Once a week for 5 weeks, 58 adults consumed one of four preloads (266 g; 125 kcal [523 kJ]), or no preload (control), followed by a test meal consumed ad libitum 15 min later. Results showed that eating apple reduced lunch energy intake (preload + test meal) by 15% (187 ± 36 kcal [782 ± 151 kJ]) compared to control (p < 0.0001) and decreased energy intake compared to applesauce and both juices. Fullness ratings differed significantly after preload consumption (apple > applesauce > both juices > control). Overall, whole apple increased satiety more than applesauce or apple juice. Adding naturally occurring levels of fiber to juice did not enhance satiety. These results suggest that solid fruit affects satiety more than pureed fruit or juice, and that eating fruit at the start of a meal can reduce energy intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-422
Number of pages7
JournalAppetite
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of fruit in different forms on energy intake and satiety at a meal'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this