The effect of indirect calorimetry measurement on claudication pain in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

C. J. Womack, A. W. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effect of indirect calorimetry measurement on the duration to onset and maximal claudication pain and hemodynamic measures was evaluated. Fifteen male patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) performed two graded exercise tests (GXTs) in random order, one with and the other without the use of indirect calorimetry measurement. During the tests the time to onset and maximal claudication pain was recorded. Before and after the tests, ankle/brachial systolic pressure index (ABI) was determined. The time to onset of claudication pain was shorter for the test with indirect calorimetry (4:49 ± 3:50 vs 5:44 ± 4:39 min:sec, p < 0.005). Time to maximal claudication pain was not significantly different between the two conditions (8:58 ± 3:01 min:sec with indirect calorimetry, 9:39 ± 3:36 min:sec, without). There were no significant differences in ABI between the two testing sessions at any time point. Results of this study suggest that indirect calorimetry measurement can be utilized without compromising maximal claudication pain time or hemodynamic measurements but that time to onset of claudication pain is hastened with indirect calorimetry measurement in patients with PAOD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)985-990
Number of pages6
JournalAngiology
Volume49
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1998

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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