The effect of intravenous infusion of antidiuretic hormone on water intake in the rat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. In rats the continuous I.V. infusion of ADH at rates up to 6·0 mu. kg−1 min−1 decreased drinking caused by water deprivation, by a 10% increase in osmotic pressure, and by caval ligation. 2. Infusion of ADH at rates between 0·07 and 6·0 mu. kg−1 min−1 never potentiated drinking nor did it significantly affect the 24 hr water intake of rats that were in water balance at the start of the experiment. 3. Urine output was slowed by a rate of infusion (13·0 μu. kg−1 min−1) which was approximately 150 times smaller than the lowest rate which was found to decrease water intake. 4. Since the rates of infusion of ADH which directly affect water intake and urine flow are so different, it is unlikely that ADH is a general homoeostatic hormone which controls both thirst and urine output in the rat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-339
Number of pages9
JournalThe Journal of Physiology
Volume219
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1971

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Vasopressins
Intravenous Infusions
Drinking
Urine
Water Deprivation
Thirst
Venae Cavae
Osmotic Pressure
Drinking Water
Ligation
Hormones
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology

Cite this

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abstract = "1. In rats the continuous I.V. infusion of ADH at rates up to 6·0 mu. kg−1 min−1 decreased drinking caused by water deprivation, by a 10{\%} increase in osmotic pressure, and by caval ligation. 2. Infusion of ADH at rates between 0·07 and 6·0 mu. kg−1 min−1 never potentiated drinking nor did it significantly affect the 24 hr water intake of rats that were in water balance at the start of the experiment. 3. Urine output was slowed by a rate of infusion (13·0 μu. kg−1 min−1) which was approximately 150 times smaller than the lowest rate which was found to decrease water intake. 4. Since the rates of infusion of ADH which directly affect water intake and urine flow are so different, it is unlikely that ADH is a general homoeostatic hormone which controls both thirst and urine output in the rat.",
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The effect of intravenous infusion of antidiuretic hormone on water intake in the rat. / Rolls, Barbara Jean.

In: The Journal of Physiology, Vol. 219, No. 2, 01.12.1971, p. 331-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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