The effect of nearby bubbles on array gain

Richard Lee Culver, J. Daniel Park, Timothy G. Leighton, David G.H. Coles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The coherent processing of signals from multiple hydrophones in an array offers improvements in angular resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. When the array is steered in a particular direction, the signals arriving from that direction are added in phase, and any signals arriving from other directions are not. Array gain (AG) is a measure of how much the signal arriving from the steering direction is amplified relative to signals arriving from all other directions. The subject of this paper is the manner in which the AG of an acoustic array operating in water that contains air bubbles is affected by scattering from nearby bubbles. The effects of bubbles on acoustic attenuation and dispersion are considered separately from their effects on AG. Acoustic measurements made in bubbly water using the AB Wood tank at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, in June 2008 show that as bubble density increases, relative phase shifts in individual hydrophone signals increase and signal correlation among the hydrophones is reduced. A theory and numerical simulation linking bubble density at the hydrophone to the AG is in good agreement with the measurements up to the point where multiple scattering becomes important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3812-3826
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume130
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

bubbles
hydrophones
acoustic attenuation
acoustic measurement
acoustics
Bubble
angular resolution
scattering
water
signal to noise ratios
phase shift
vibration
air
Acoustics
simulation
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Culver, Richard Lee ; Park, J. Daniel ; Leighton, Timothy G. ; Coles, David G.H. / The effect of nearby bubbles on array gain. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2011 ; Vol. 130, No. 6. pp. 3812-3826.
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The effect of nearby bubbles on array gain. / Culver, Richard Lee; Park, J. Daniel; Leighton, Timothy G.; Coles, David G.H.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 130, No. 6, 01.12.2011, p. 3812-3826.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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