The effect of particle dimensionality on granular friction in laboratory shear zones

Kevin M. Frye, Chris J. Marone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To match the boundary conditions of numerical models and to examine the effect of particle dimensionality on granular friction, we conducted laboratory experiments on rods sheared in 1-D and 2-D configurations, glass beads (3-D), and angular quartz sand (rough 3-D). The average coefficient of friction during stable sliding for 1-D, 2-D, smooth 3-D, and rough 3-D particles is 0.15, 0.3, 0.45, and 0.6, respectively. Frictional strength of 2-D layers exceeds 1-D friction by an amount associated with dilatancy and the additional contact plane in 2-D. We show that 3-D granular friction exceeds 2-D friction by the amount of interparticle friction on the out-of-plane particle contacts that do not exist in 2-D. Data from our 2-D experiments are remarkably similar to numerical results based on 2-D particle dynamic simulations. Our data indicate that application of numerical models of granular friction to tectonic faults will require computations involving rough, 3-D particles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-21
Number of pages2
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume29
Issue number19
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

Fingerprint

shear zone
friction
shear
D region
dilatancy
beads
coefficient of friction
sands
sliding
laboratory
effect
particle
tectonics
rods
quartz
boundary conditions
boundary condition
glass
sand
configurations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Geophysics

Cite this

@article{c6d86bb1d263436ea3308213767e0736,
title = "The effect of particle dimensionality on granular friction in laboratory shear zones",
abstract = "To match the boundary conditions of numerical models and to examine the effect of particle dimensionality on granular friction, we conducted laboratory experiments on rods sheared in 1-D and 2-D configurations, glass beads (3-D), and angular quartz sand (rough 3-D). The average coefficient of friction during stable sliding for 1-D, 2-D, smooth 3-D, and rough 3-D particles is 0.15, 0.3, 0.45, and 0.6, respectively. Frictional strength of 2-D layers exceeds 1-D friction by an amount associated with dilatancy and the additional contact plane in 2-D. We show that 3-D granular friction exceeds 2-D friction by the amount of interparticle friction on the out-of-plane particle contacts that do not exist in 2-D. Data from our 2-D experiments are remarkably similar to numerical results based on 2-D particle dynamic simulations. Our data indicate that application of numerical models of granular friction to tectonic faults will require computations involving rough, 3-D particles.",
author = "Frye, {Kevin M.} and Marone, {Chris J.}",
year = "2002",
month = "10",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "22--21",
journal = "Geophysical Research Letters",
issn = "0094-8276",
publisher = "American Geophysical Union",
number = "19",

}

The effect of particle dimensionality on granular friction in laboratory shear zones. / Frye, Kevin M.; Marone, Chris J.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29, No. 19, 01.10.2002, p. 22-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of particle dimensionality on granular friction in laboratory shear zones

AU - Frye, Kevin M.

AU - Marone, Chris J.

PY - 2002/10/1

Y1 - 2002/10/1

N2 - To match the boundary conditions of numerical models and to examine the effect of particle dimensionality on granular friction, we conducted laboratory experiments on rods sheared in 1-D and 2-D configurations, glass beads (3-D), and angular quartz sand (rough 3-D). The average coefficient of friction during stable sliding for 1-D, 2-D, smooth 3-D, and rough 3-D particles is 0.15, 0.3, 0.45, and 0.6, respectively. Frictional strength of 2-D layers exceeds 1-D friction by an amount associated with dilatancy and the additional contact plane in 2-D. We show that 3-D granular friction exceeds 2-D friction by the amount of interparticle friction on the out-of-plane particle contacts that do not exist in 2-D. Data from our 2-D experiments are remarkably similar to numerical results based on 2-D particle dynamic simulations. Our data indicate that application of numerical models of granular friction to tectonic faults will require computations involving rough, 3-D particles.

AB - To match the boundary conditions of numerical models and to examine the effect of particle dimensionality on granular friction, we conducted laboratory experiments on rods sheared in 1-D and 2-D configurations, glass beads (3-D), and angular quartz sand (rough 3-D). The average coefficient of friction during stable sliding for 1-D, 2-D, smooth 3-D, and rough 3-D particles is 0.15, 0.3, 0.45, and 0.6, respectively. Frictional strength of 2-D layers exceeds 1-D friction by an amount associated with dilatancy and the additional contact plane in 2-D. We show that 3-D granular friction exceeds 2-D friction by the amount of interparticle friction on the out-of-plane particle contacts that do not exist in 2-D. Data from our 2-D experiments are remarkably similar to numerical results based on 2-D particle dynamic simulations. Our data indicate that application of numerical models of granular friction to tectonic faults will require computations involving rough, 3-D particles.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036820036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036820036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0036820036

VL - 29

SP - 22

EP - 21

JO - Geophysical Research Letters

JF - Geophysical Research Letters

SN - 0094-8276

IS - 19

ER -