The effect of power and gender on technology acceptance

Lu Zhang, Peter Nyheim, Anna S. Mattila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to examine the joint effect of power and gender on individuals’ perceptions and evaluations of information systems (IS), and their behavioral intentions of technology acceptance.

Design/methodology/approach – This study uses a 2 (powerful vs powerless) × 2 (female vs male) between-subject experimental design. A total of 128 subjects participated in the experiment.

Findings – The results suggest that there is a significant gender difference in terms of technology acceptance in the high-power condition. Further, such a gender difference is attenuated in the low-power condition. Specifically, when primed with the feeling of powerful, male users (vs female users) have higher computer self-efficacy and rate the IS as easier to use and more enjoyable. However, when the feeling of powerless was elicited, the effect of gender on technology acceptance disappeared.

Originality/value – The gender effect on technology acceptance has been widely studied. The current research extends the literature by considering the moderating effect of power on such a gender effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-314
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 14 2014

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gender
Information systems
information system
Design of experiments
experimental design
technology acceptance
effect
Technology acceptance
methodology
Experiments
Gender differences
Gender effects
experiment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Information Systems
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

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The effect of power and gender on technology acceptance. / Zhang, Lu; Nyheim, Peter; Mattila, Anna S.

In: Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, Vol. 5, No. 3, 14.10.2014, p. 299-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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