The Effect of the PROSPER Partnership Model on Cultivating Local Stakeholder Knowledge of Evidence-Based Programs: A Five-Year Longitudinal Study of 28 Communities

Daniel Max Crowley, Mark T. Greenberg, Mark Ethan Feinberg, Richard L. Spoth, Cleve R. Redmond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

A substantial challenge in improving public health is how to facilitate the local adoption of evidence-based interventions (EBIs). To do so, an important step is to build local stakeholders' knowledge and decision-making skills regarding the adoption and implementation of EBIs. One EBI delivery system, called PROSPER (PROmoting School-community-university Partnerships to Enhance Resilience), has effectively mobilized community prevention efforts, implemented prevention programming with quality, and consequently decreased youth substance abuse. While these results are encouraging, another objective is to increase local stakeholder knowledge of best practices for adoption, implementation and evaluation of EBIs. Using a mixed methods approach, we assessed local stakeholder knowledge of these best practices over 5 years, in 28 intervention and control communities. Results indicated that the PROSPER partnership model led to significant increases in expert knowledge regarding the selection, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based interventions. Findings illustrate the limited programming knowledge possessed by members of local prevention efforts, the difficulty of complete knowledge transfer, and highlight one method for cultivating that knowledge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-105
Number of pages10
JournalPrevention Science
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Effect of the PROSPER Partnership Model on Cultivating Local Stakeholder Knowledge of Evidence-Based Programs: A Five-Year Longitudinal Study of 28 Communities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this