The effects of a cluster randomized controlled workplace intervention on sleep and work-family conflict outcomes in an extended care setting

Miguel Marino, Marie Killerby, Soomi Lee, Laura Cousino Klein, Phyllis Moen, Ryan Olson, Ellen Ernst Kossek, Rosalind King, Leslie Erickson, Lisa F. Berkman, Orfeu M. Buxton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To evaluate the effects of a workplace-based intervention on actigraphic and self-reported sleep outcomes in an extended-care setting. Design Cluster randomized trial. Setting Extended-care (nursing) facilities. Participants US employees and managers at nursing homes. Nursing homes were randomly selected to intervention or control settings. Intervention The Work, Family, and Health Study developed an intervention aimed at reducing work-family conflict within a 4-month work-family organizational change process. Employees participated in interactive sessions with facilitated discussions, role-playing, and games designed to increase control over work processes and work time. Managers completed training in family-supportive supervision. Measurements Primary actigraphic outcomes included total sleep duration, wake after sleep onset, nighttime sleep, variation in nighttime sleep, nap duration, and number of naps. Secondary survey outcomes included work-to-family conflict, sleep insufficiency, insomnia symptoms, and sleep quality. Measures were obtained at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months postintervention. Results A total of 1522 employees and 184 managers provided survey data at baseline. Managers and employees in the intervention arm showed no significant difference in sleep outcomes over time compared with control participants. Sleep outcomes were not moderated by work-to-family conflict or presence of children in the household for managers or employees. Age significantly moderated an intervention effect on nighttime sleep among employees (P = .040), where younger employees benefited more from the intervention. Conclusion In the context of an extended-care nursing home workplace, the intervention did not significantly alter sleep outcomes in either managers or employees. Moderating effects of age were identified where younger employees’ sleep outcomes benefited more from the intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-308
Number of pages12
JournalSleep health
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Workplace
Sleep
Nursing Homes
Conflict (Psychology)
Role Playing
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Organizational Innovation
Family Health
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Marino, Miguel ; Killerby, Marie ; Lee, Soomi ; Klein, Laura Cousino ; Moen, Phyllis ; Olson, Ryan ; Kossek, Ellen Ernst ; King, Rosalind ; Erickson, Leslie ; Berkman, Lisa F. ; Buxton, Orfeu M. / The effects of a cluster randomized controlled workplace intervention on sleep and work-family conflict outcomes in an extended care setting. In: Sleep health. 2016 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 297-308.
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The effects of a cluster randomized controlled workplace intervention on sleep and work-family conflict outcomes in an extended care setting. / Marino, Miguel; Killerby, Marie; Lee, Soomi; Klein, Laura Cousino; Moen, Phyllis; Olson, Ryan; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; King, Rosalind; Erickson, Leslie; Berkman, Lisa F.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

In: Sleep health, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.12.2016, p. 297-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Objectives To evaluate the effects of a workplace-based intervention on actigraphic and self-reported sleep outcomes in an extended-care setting. Design Cluster randomized trial. Setting Extended-care (nursing) facilities. Participants US employees and managers at nursing homes. Nursing homes were randomly selected to intervention or control settings. Intervention The Work, Family, and Health Study developed an intervention aimed at reducing work-family conflict within a 4-month work-family organizational change process. Employees participated in interactive sessions with facilitated discussions, role-playing, and games designed to increase control over work processes and work time. Managers completed training in family-supportive supervision. Measurements Primary actigraphic outcomes included total sleep duration, wake after sleep onset, nighttime sleep, variation in nighttime sleep, nap duration, and number of naps. Secondary survey outcomes included work-to-family conflict, sleep insufficiency, insomnia symptoms, and sleep quality. Measures were obtained at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months postintervention. Results A total of 1522 employees and 184 managers provided survey data at baseline. Managers and employees in the intervention arm showed no significant difference in sleep outcomes over time compared with control participants. Sleep outcomes were not moderated by work-to-family conflict or presence of children in the household for managers or employees. Age significantly moderated an intervention effect on nighttime sleep among employees (P = .040), where younger employees benefited more from the intervention. Conclusion In the context of an extended-care nursing home workplace, the intervention did not significantly alter sleep outcomes in either managers or employees. Moderating effects of age were identified where younger employees’ sleep outcomes benefited more from the intervention.

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