The effects of adolescent heavy drinking on the timing and stability of cohabitation and marriage

Lela Rankin Williams, Laura Wray-Lake, Eric Loken, Jennifer Maggs

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on prospective British Cohort Study data, adolescent alcohol use predicted the timing and stability of committed partnerships between 16 and 34 years (n = 3278; 59% female). Propensity score methods balanced age 16 heavy drinkers (32%) and nonheavy drinkers on a range of relevant risk factors assessed in infancy and childhood. Adolescent heavy drinking predicted having ever cohabited, earlier transitions into cohabiting and marital relationships, more breakups, and an increased likelihood of divorce. Gender and social class moderated these relationships; heavy-drinking working-class males were especially likely to cohabit and to experience early entry into cohabitation and marriage. Implications for practitioners focus on the benefits of reducing adolescent heavy drinking and precocious transitions to committed partnerships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-188
Number of pages8
JournalFamilies in Society
Volume93
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

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cohabitation
marriage
adolescent
divorce
working class
social class
childhood
alcohol
gender
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Williams, Lela Rankin ; Wray-Lake, Laura ; Loken, Eric ; Maggs, Jennifer. / The effects of adolescent heavy drinking on the timing and stability of cohabitation and marriage. In: Families in Society. 2012 ; Vol. 93, No. 3. pp. 181-188.
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The effects of adolescent heavy drinking on the timing and stability of cohabitation and marriage. / Williams, Lela Rankin; Wray-Lake, Laura; Loken, Eric; Maggs, Jennifer.

In: Families in Society, Vol. 93, No. 3, 01.07.2012, p. 181-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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