The effects of combined elastic- and free-weight tension vs. free-weight tension on one-repetition maximum strength in the bench press

David M. Bellar, Matthew D. Muller, Jacob E. Barkley, Chul Ho Kim, Keisuke Ida, Edward J. Ryan, Mathew V. Bliss, Ellen L. Glickman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study investigated the effects of training combining elastic tension, free weights, and the bench press. Eleven college-aged men (untrained) in the bench press participated in the 13-week study. The participants were first given instructions and then practiced the bench press, followed by a one-repetition maximum (1RM) test of baseline strength. Subjects were then trained in the bench press for 3 weeks to allow for the beginning of neural adaptation. After another 1RM test, participants were assigned to 1 of 2 conditions for the next 3 weeks of training: 85% Free-Weight Tension, 15% Elastic Tension (BAND), or 100% Free-Weight Tension (STAND). After 3 weeks of training and a third 1RM max test, participants switched treatments, under which they completed the final 3 weeks of training and the fourth 1RM test. Analysis via analysis of covariance revealed a significant (p # 0.05) main effect for time and interaction effect for Treatment (BAND vs. STAND). Subsequent analysis via paired-samples t-test revealed the BAND condition was significantly better (p = 0.05) at producing raw gains in 1RM strength. (BAND 9.95 ± 3.7 kg vs. STAND 7.56 ± 2.8 kg). These results suggest that the addition of elastic tension to the bench press may be an effective method of increasing strength.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-463
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of strength and conditioning research
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of combined elastic- and free-weight tension vs. free-weight tension on one-repetition maximum strength in the bench press'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this