The effects of different feedback strategies using computer-administered multiple-choice questions as instruction

Roy Clariana, Steven M. Ross, Gary R. Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of using different forms of computer-based feedback on high school students' learning of science material. The basic design consisted of two conditions of instructional support (text and questions vs. questions only), two testings (immediate vs. retention), five levels of similarity between lesson and posttest questions, and five feedback conditions: knowledge of correct response (KCR), delayed KCR, answer until correct (AUC), questions only (no feedback), and no questions. Results showed significant benefits for feedback over no feedback, with AUC becoming more advantageous and delayed feedback less so as lesson-posttest question similarity decreased. Also, with decreased question similarity and the availability of supporting text, overall feedback effects tended to decrease. The results are discussed in terms of the information processing effects of the different feedback forms, a factor that CBI designers often fail to exploit in planning feedback conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-17
Number of pages13
JournalEducational Technology Research and Development
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1991

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

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