The Effects of EPA, DHA, and Aspirin Ingestion on Plasma Lysophospholipids and Autotaxin

R. C. Block, R. Duff, P. Lawrence, L. Kakinami, J. T. Brenna, Gregory C. Shearer, N. Meednu, S. Mousa, A. Friedman, W. S. Harris, Mark Larson, S. Georas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lysophophatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are potent lysolipid mediators increasingly linked with atherosclerosis and inflammation. A current model proposing that plasma LPA is produced when LPC is hydrolyzed by the enzyme autotaxin has not been rigorously investigated in human subjects. We conducted a clinical trial of eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid (EPA/DHA) and aspirin ingestion in normal volunteers. Fasting blood samples were drawn at baseline and after 4-week supplementation with EPA/DHA (3.4. g/d) with and without aspirin (650. mg). Plasma LPC and LPA species and autotaxin activity were measured. EPA-LPC and DHA-LPC concentrations increased significantly with EPA/DHA supplementation whereas EPA- and DHA-LPA did not. Autotaxin activity was unaffected by any treatment, and aspirin had no effect on any endpoint. Taken together, our data demonstrate that plasma LPC, but not LPA, species can be dynamically regulated by dietary supplementation, and argue against a simple model of LPA generation via LPC hydrolysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-95
Number of pages9
JournalProstaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids
Volume82
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

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Lysophospholipids
Aspirin
Eating
Plasmas
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Dietary Supplements
lysophosphatidic acid
Hydrolysis
Fasting
Atherosclerosis
Healthy Volunteers
Blood
Clinical Trials
Inflammation
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Block, R. C. ; Duff, R. ; Lawrence, P. ; Kakinami, L. ; Brenna, J. T. ; Shearer, Gregory C. ; Meednu, N. ; Mousa, S. ; Friedman, A. ; Harris, W. S. ; Larson, Mark ; Georas, S. / The Effects of EPA, DHA, and Aspirin Ingestion on Plasma Lysophospholipids and Autotaxin. In: Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids. 2010 ; Vol. 82, No. 2-3. pp. 87-95.
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Block, RC, Duff, R, Lawrence, P, Kakinami, L, Brenna, JT, Shearer, GC, Meednu, N, Mousa, S, Friedman, A, Harris, WS, Larson, M & Georas, S 2010, 'The Effects of EPA, DHA, and Aspirin Ingestion on Plasma Lysophospholipids and Autotaxin', Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, vol. 82, no. 2-3, pp. 87-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.plefa.2009.12.005

The Effects of EPA, DHA, and Aspirin Ingestion on Plasma Lysophospholipids and Autotaxin. / Block, R. C.; Duff, R.; Lawrence, P.; Kakinami, L.; Brenna, J. T.; Shearer, Gregory C.; Meednu, N.; Mousa, S.; Friedman, A.; Harris, W. S.; Larson, Mark; Georas, S.

In: Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, Vol. 82, No. 2-3, 01.02.2010, p. 87-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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