The Effects of Relaxation Training With Cognitive or Nondirective Therapy and the Role of Relaxation-Induced Anxiety in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety

T. D. Borkovec, Andrew M. Mathews, Alycia Chambers, Seda Ebrahimi, Richard Lytle, Ruth Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Thirty volunteers who met criteria for generalized anxiety disorder received 12 sessions of training in progressive muscular relaxation. Sixteen of the clients also were given cognitive therapy during 10 of those sessions, and the remaining 14 received nondirective therapy. Therapy was provided by 16 graduate student clinicians. The group as a whole showed substantial reductions in anxiety as measured by psychiatric assessor ratings, questionnaires, and daily self-monitoring, although relaxation plus cognitive therapy produced significantly greater improvement than relaxation plus nondirective therapy on several pretherapy-posttherapy questionnaires. Relaxation-induced anxiety, as measured by a questionnaire after each relaxation session, was significantly related to improvement in the total group: Clients who became anxious during relaxation training showed the least improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)883-888
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1987

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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