The effects of social skills training and peer involvement on the social adjustment of preadolescents.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

139 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of social skills training and peer involvement on the peer acceptance of disliked preadolescents. 56 fifth- and sixth-grade children were identified as unaccepted by their peers and deficient in conversational skills. These children were then randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment conditions: (1) conversational skills training (individual coaching), (2) peer involvement under superordinate goals (group experience), (3) conversational skills training combined with peer involvement (group experience with coaching), and (4) a no-treatment control. Differential treatment effects were observed at both a posttreatment and follow-up assessment. As predicted, conversational skills training promoted skill acquisition and increased skillful social interaction. Peer involvement increased peer acceptance and children's self-perceptions of their social efficacy. The results were interpreted in terms of a developmentally based multidimensional model of social competence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-162
Number of pages12
JournalChild Development
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
social adjustment
coaching
Peer Group
acceptance
Interpersonal Relations
Self Concept
social competence
Therapeutics
self-image
experience
Group
Social Skills
interaction
Mentoring

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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The effects of social skills training and peer involvement on the social adjustment of preadolescents. / Bierman, Karen Linn; Furman, W.

In: Child Development, Vol. 55, No. 1, 01.01.1984, p. 151-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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