The effects of the transition to parenthood and subsequent children on men's well-being and social participation

Chris Knoester, David Eggebeen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study uses data (N = 3,088) from the first two waves of the National Survey of Families and Households to explore the effects of the transition to fatherhood and the addition of subsequent children on men's psychological and physical health, contacts with extended family, social interactions, and work behaviors. The results sugget that new children lead to changes in men's well-being and social participation, but the effects are conditioned by the structural context of fatherhood and men's initial fatherhood status. Overall, the evidence indicates that the transition to parenthood and the addition of subsequent children primarily transform the organization of men's lives, especially when they become coresident fathers. Men making the transition to parenthood are most likely to be affected. Fatherhood encourages men to increase intergenerational and extended family interactions, participation in service-oriented activities, and hours in paid labor - at the expense of spending time socializing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1532-1560
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Family Issues
Volume27
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

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social participation
parenthood
fatherhood
well-being
extended family
interaction
father
social work
contact
labor
organization
participation
health
evidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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The effects of the transition to parenthood and subsequent children on men's well-being and social participation. / Knoester, Chris; Eggebeen, David.

In: Journal of Family Issues, Vol. 27, No. 11, 01.11.2006, p. 1532-1560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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