The efficacy of Kiko exercises on the prevention of migraine headaches: A pilot study

Victor Elinoff, Steven Jay Lynn, Hidy Ochiai, Michael Nelson Hallquist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Migraine headaches, a common chronic medical problem, require prophylactic treatment when they are frequent and severe. This is the first study to investigate the efficacy of Kiko, a Japanese practice of Qigong that uses repetitive coordinated breathing and movement as a prophylactic treatment of migraine headaches. This pilot study, a single arm, non-randomized 4-month trial, investigated whether 3 months of Kiko training would reduce the severity and/or frequency of migraine and/or MIDAS scores. The baseline migraine data were collected from participants in the first month and then participants were taught Kiko exercises in 3 monthly sessions. Participants practiced at home and had the opportunity to utilize a Kiko DVD. The participants were instructed by Washin-Ryu style martial arts Master, Hidy Ochiai. Subjects completed monthly diaries that recorded the frequency and severity of their migraines, as well as the frequency and duration of their home Kiko practice. Six of the original 13 subjects completed the trial. All the individuals who completed the study had measurable improvement in their migraines. All participants reported a positive experience in learning the technique, and there were no reported adverse effects. Although the results of this study need to be confirmed in a larger clinical trial with adequate controls for placebo effects, these preliminary results are consistent with other trials that have documented the potential benefits of mind-body practices in controlling symptoms and improving the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic medical illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-470
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Chinese Medicine
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 2009

Fingerprint

Migraine Disorders
Qigong
Martial Arts
Placebo Effect
Respiration
Chronic Disease
Quality of Life
Clinical Trials
Learning
Exercise
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

@article{9cbab63cd04048839927af2b0bff3165,
title = "The efficacy of Kiko exercises on the prevention of migraine headaches: A pilot study",
abstract = "Migraine headaches, a common chronic medical problem, require prophylactic treatment when they are frequent and severe. This is the first study to investigate the efficacy of Kiko, a Japanese practice of Qigong that uses repetitive coordinated breathing and movement as a prophylactic treatment of migraine headaches. This pilot study, a single arm, non-randomized 4-month trial, investigated whether 3 months of Kiko training would reduce the severity and/or frequency of migraine and/or MIDAS scores. The baseline migraine data were collected from participants in the first month and then participants were taught Kiko exercises in 3 monthly sessions. Participants practiced at home and had the opportunity to utilize a Kiko DVD. The participants were instructed by Washin-Ryu style martial arts Master, Hidy Ochiai. Subjects completed monthly diaries that recorded the frequency and severity of their migraines, as well as the frequency and duration of their home Kiko practice. Six of the original 13 subjects completed the trial. All the individuals who completed the study had measurable improvement in their migraines. All participants reported a positive experience in learning the technique, and there were no reported adverse effects. Although the results of this study need to be confirmed in a larger clinical trial with adequate controls for placebo effects, these preliminary results are consistent with other trials that have documented the potential benefits of mind-body practices in controlling symptoms and improving the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic medical illness.",
author = "Victor Elinoff and Lynn, {Steven Jay} and Hidy Ochiai and Hallquist, {Michael Nelson}",
year = "2009",
month = "8",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1142/S0192415X09006977",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "459--470",
journal = "American Journal of Chinese Medicine",
issn = "0192-415X",
publisher = "World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd",
number = "3",

}

The efficacy of Kiko exercises on the prevention of migraine headaches : A pilot study. / Elinoff, Victor; Lynn, Steven Jay; Ochiai, Hidy; Hallquist, Michael Nelson.

In: American Journal of Chinese Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 3, 10.08.2009, p. 459-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The efficacy of Kiko exercises on the prevention of migraine headaches

T2 - A pilot study

AU - Elinoff, Victor

AU - Lynn, Steven Jay

AU - Ochiai, Hidy

AU - Hallquist, Michael Nelson

PY - 2009/8/10

Y1 - 2009/8/10

N2 - Migraine headaches, a common chronic medical problem, require prophylactic treatment when they are frequent and severe. This is the first study to investigate the efficacy of Kiko, a Japanese practice of Qigong that uses repetitive coordinated breathing and movement as a prophylactic treatment of migraine headaches. This pilot study, a single arm, non-randomized 4-month trial, investigated whether 3 months of Kiko training would reduce the severity and/or frequency of migraine and/or MIDAS scores. The baseline migraine data were collected from participants in the first month and then participants were taught Kiko exercises in 3 monthly sessions. Participants practiced at home and had the opportunity to utilize a Kiko DVD. The participants were instructed by Washin-Ryu style martial arts Master, Hidy Ochiai. Subjects completed monthly diaries that recorded the frequency and severity of their migraines, as well as the frequency and duration of their home Kiko practice. Six of the original 13 subjects completed the trial. All the individuals who completed the study had measurable improvement in their migraines. All participants reported a positive experience in learning the technique, and there were no reported adverse effects. Although the results of this study need to be confirmed in a larger clinical trial with adequate controls for placebo effects, these preliminary results are consistent with other trials that have documented the potential benefits of mind-body practices in controlling symptoms and improving the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic medical illness.

AB - Migraine headaches, a common chronic medical problem, require prophylactic treatment when they are frequent and severe. This is the first study to investigate the efficacy of Kiko, a Japanese practice of Qigong that uses repetitive coordinated breathing and movement as a prophylactic treatment of migraine headaches. This pilot study, a single arm, non-randomized 4-month trial, investigated whether 3 months of Kiko training would reduce the severity and/or frequency of migraine and/or MIDAS scores. The baseline migraine data were collected from participants in the first month and then participants were taught Kiko exercises in 3 monthly sessions. Participants practiced at home and had the opportunity to utilize a Kiko DVD. The participants were instructed by Washin-Ryu style martial arts Master, Hidy Ochiai. Subjects completed monthly diaries that recorded the frequency and severity of their migraines, as well as the frequency and duration of their home Kiko practice. Six of the original 13 subjects completed the trial. All the individuals who completed the study had measurable improvement in their migraines. All participants reported a positive experience in learning the technique, and there were no reported adverse effects. Although the results of this study need to be confirmed in a larger clinical trial with adequate controls for placebo effects, these preliminary results are consistent with other trials that have documented the potential benefits of mind-body practices in controlling symptoms and improving the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic medical illness.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=68149125335&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=68149125335&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1142/S0192415X09006977

DO - 10.1142/S0192415X09006977

M3 - Article

C2 - 19606507

AN - SCOPUS:68149125335

VL - 37

SP - 459

EP - 470

JO - American Journal of Chinese Medicine

JF - American Journal of Chinese Medicine

SN - 0192-415X

IS - 3

ER -