The emotions of graduating medical students about prior patient care experiences

Alison S. Clay, Elizabeth Ross, Saumil M. Chudgar, Colleen O Connor Grochowski, James A. Tulsky, Dan Shapiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the emotional responses to patient care activities described by fourth year medical students. Methods: Qualitative content analysis for emerging themes in letters written by graduating medical students to patients during a Capstone Course. The patient need not be alive and the letter would never be sent. Results: Six themes emerged from student letters: (1) Sorrow for the depths of patient suffering (2) Gratitude towards patients and their families; (3) Personal responsibility for care provided to patients; (4) Regret for poor care provided by the student or student's team; (5) Shattered expectations about medicine and training; and (6) Anger towards patients. Students expressed sensitivity to vulnerable patients, including those who were alone, unable to communicate, or for whom care was biased. Students' expressed powerlessness (inability to cure, managing a work-life balance, and challenges with hierarchy) in some essays. Conclusion: At graduation, medical students describe strong emotions about previous patient care experiences, including difficulty witnessing suffering, disappointment with medicine, and gratitude to patients and their families. Practice implications: Providing regular opportunities for writing throughout medical education would allow students to recognize their emotions, reflect upon them and promote wellness that would benefit students and their patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-349
Number of pages6
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume98
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Medical Students
Patient Care
Emotions
Students
Psychological Stress
Medicine
Anger
Medical Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Clay, Alison S. ; Ross, Elizabeth ; Chudgar, Saumil M. ; Grochowski, Colleen O Connor ; Tulsky, James A. ; Shapiro, Dan. / The emotions of graduating medical students about prior patient care experiences. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2015 ; Vol. 98, No. 3. pp. 344-349.
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The emotions of graduating medical students about prior patient care experiences. / Clay, Alison S.; Ross, Elizabeth; Chudgar, Saumil M.; Grochowski, Colleen O Connor; Tulsky, James A.; Shapiro, Dan.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 98, No. 3, 01.03.2015, p. 344-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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