The Ethos of "Getting the Story"

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter discusses some key ethical implications of the mechanics of news work: the moral questions raised in the process of getting the story. These questions necessarily address the individual and sociological dimensions. That is, they deal with both the decision-making processes of individual journalists, and the strong cultural and professional norms and standards in the newsroom that influence journalists' behavior. Other questions address the realm of media effects: what are intended and unintended impacts on audiences, and how might those impacts inform our decisions and judgments about news work? The chapter's thesis is that, done well - ethically well - "getting the story" is an ennobling activity, one that benefits journalism and the public alike.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJournalism Ethics
Subtitle of host publicationA Philosophical Approach
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199776610
ISBN (Print)9780195370805
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

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Ethos
Journalists
News
Media Effects
Journalism
Decision-making Process

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Plaisance, P. (2010). The Ethos of "Getting the Story". In Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195370805.003.0020
Plaisance, Patrick. / The Ethos of "Getting the Story". Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press, 2010.
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Plaisance, P 2010, The Ethos of "Getting the Story". in Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195370805.003.0020

The Ethos of "Getting the Story". / Plaisance, Patrick.

Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press, 2010.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Plaisance P. The Ethos of "Getting the Story". In Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press. 2010 https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195370805.003.0020