The Every Student Succeeds Act, State Efforts to Improve Access to Effective Educators, and the Importance of School Leadership

Edward J. Fuller, Liz Hollingworth, Andrew Pendola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Our primary purpose is to examine the degree to which state equity plans identify the distribution of principals and principal turnover as factors influencing three leadership mechanisms that affect student access to effective teachers—namely, hiring of teachers, building instructional capacity of teachers, and managing teacher turnover. Research Design: This study relies on document analyses of 52 plans (50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico) submitted by states in 2015 to the U.S. Department of Education. These plans included the identification of root causes of the inequitable access to educators within a state as well as proposed solutions to address the inequitable access. Findings: We found that, while 27% of states mentioned the distribution of principals and 48% of states mentioned principal turnover, less than 10% of states connected these two factors to access to effective teachers for each of the three mechanisms. Furthermore, only three states mentioned that principal turnover is associated with teacher turnover and three states discussed that teacher turnover is heavily influenced by the school working conditions created in large part by the principal. Moreover, we found the U.S. Department of Education and most states did not present data on either the inequitable distribution of principals or principal turnover. Finally, we determined that states frequently mention solutions to improving access to effective educators that are unsupported by research under the Every Student Succeeds Act rules of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-756
Number of pages30
JournalEducational Administration Quarterly
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

turnover
act
educator
leadership
school
teacher
student
Puerto Rico
hiring
working conditions
research planning
education
equity
cause
evidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Public Administration

Cite this

@article{2d877340def545878849b668abb6d5a7,
title = "The Every Student Succeeds Act, State Efforts to Improve Access to Effective Educators, and the Importance of School Leadership",
abstract = "Purpose: Our primary purpose is to examine the degree to which state equity plans identify the distribution of principals and principal turnover as factors influencing three leadership mechanisms that affect student access to effective teachers—namely, hiring of teachers, building instructional capacity of teachers, and managing teacher turnover. Research Design: This study relies on document analyses of 52 plans (50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico) submitted by states in 2015 to the U.S. Department of Education. These plans included the identification of root causes of the inequitable access to educators within a state as well as proposed solutions to address the inequitable access. Findings: We found that, while 27{\%} of states mentioned the distribution of principals and 48{\%} of states mentioned principal turnover, less than 10{\%} of states connected these two factors to access to effective teachers for each of the three mechanisms. Furthermore, only three states mentioned that principal turnover is associated with teacher turnover and three states discussed that teacher turnover is heavily influenced by the school working conditions created in large part by the principal. Moreover, we found the U.S. Department of Education and most states did not present data on either the inequitable distribution of principals or principal turnover. Finally, we determined that states frequently mention solutions to improving access to effective educators that are unsupported by research under the Every Student Succeeds Act rules of evidence.",
author = "Fuller, {Edward J.} and Liz Hollingworth and Andrew Pendola",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0013161X17711481",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "53",
pages = "727--756",
journal = "Educational Administration Quarterly",
issn = "0013-161X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "5",

}

The Every Student Succeeds Act, State Efforts to Improve Access to Effective Educators, and the Importance of School Leadership. / Fuller, Edward J.; Hollingworth, Liz; Pendola, Andrew.

In: Educational Administration Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 5, 01.12.2017, p. 727-756.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Every Student Succeeds Act, State Efforts to Improve Access to Effective Educators, and the Importance of School Leadership

AU - Fuller, Edward J.

AU - Hollingworth, Liz

AU - Pendola, Andrew

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Purpose: Our primary purpose is to examine the degree to which state equity plans identify the distribution of principals and principal turnover as factors influencing three leadership mechanisms that affect student access to effective teachers—namely, hiring of teachers, building instructional capacity of teachers, and managing teacher turnover. Research Design: This study relies on document analyses of 52 plans (50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico) submitted by states in 2015 to the U.S. Department of Education. These plans included the identification of root causes of the inequitable access to educators within a state as well as proposed solutions to address the inequitable access. Findings: We found that, while 27% of states mentioned the distribution of principals and 48% of states mentioned principal turnover, less than 10% of states connected these two factors to access to effective teachers for each of the three mechanisms. Furthermore, only three states mentioned that principal turnover is associated with teacher turnover and three states discussed that teacher turnover is heavily influenced by the school working conditions created in large part by the principal. Moreover, we found the U.S. Department of Education and most states did not present data on either the inequitable distribution of principals or principal turnover. Finally, we determined that states frequently mention solutions to improving access to effective educators that are unsupported by research under the Every Student Succeeds Act rules of evidence.

AB - Purpose: Our primary purpose is to examine the degree to which state equity plans identify the distribution of principals and principal turnover as factors influencing three leadership mechanisms that affect student access to effective teachers—namely, hiring of teachers, building instructional capacity of teachers, and managing teacher turnover. Research Design: This study relies on document analyses of 52 plans (50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico) submitted by states in 2015 to the U.S. Department of Education. These plans included the identification of root causes of the inequitable access to educators within a state as well as proposed solutions to address the inequitable access. Findings: We found that, while 27% of states mentioned the distribution of principals and 48% of states mentioned principal turnover, less than 10% of states connected these two factors to access to effective teachers for each of the three mechanisms. Furthermore, only three states mentioned that principal turnover is associated with teacher turnover and three states discussed that teacher turnover is heavily influenced by the school working conditions created in large part by the principal. Moreover, we found the U.S. Department of Education and most states did not present data on either the inequitable distribution of principals or principal turnover. Finally, we determined that states frequently mention solutions to improving access to effective educators that are unsupported by research under the Every Student Succeeds Act rules of evidence.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85033781131&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85033781131&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0013161X17711481

DO - 10.1177/0013161X17711481

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85033781131

VL - 53

SP - 727

EP - 756

JO - Educational Administration Quarterly

JF - Educational Administration Quarterly

SN - 0013-161X

IS - 5

ER -