The evolution of ego-centric triads: A microscopic approach toward predicting macroscopic network properties

Mina Doroud, Prantik Bhattacharyya, S. Felix Wu, Diane Helen Felmlee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scalability issues make it time-consuming to estimate even simple characteristics of large scale, online networks, and the constantly evolving qualities of these networks make it challenging to capture a representative picture of a particular networks properties. Here we focus on the evolution of all triads (ties between three nodes) in a graph, as a method of studying change over time in large scale, online social networks. For three month snapshots, we examine, and predict, transitions among all sixteen triad types (i.e., triad census) in a sample of three years of Facebook wall-post interactions. We introduce a new sampling approach for examining triads in online graphs, based on ego-centric networks of random seeds. We examine tendencies in the data toward properties related to balance theory, including structural balance, clusterability, ranked clusters, transitivity, hierarchical clusters, and the presence of "forbidden" triads. In a time series analysis, we successfully predict the evolution over time in the wall post network dataset, with relatively low levels of error. The findings demonstrate the utility of our ego- centric, two-step, random seed sampling approach for studying large scale networks and predicting macroscopic graph properties, as well as the advantages of examining transitions in the complete triad census for an online network.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011
Pages172-179
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Event2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2011 and 2011 IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2011 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 9 2011Oct 11 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011

Other

Other2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2011 and 2011 IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2011
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/9/1110/11/11

Fingerprint

Seed
Sampling
Time series analysis
Scalability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

Doroud, M., Bhattacharyya, P., Wu, S. F., & Felmlee, D. H. (2011). The evolution of ego-centric triads: A microscopic approach toward predicting macroscopic network properties. In Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011 (pp. 172-179). [6113110] (Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011). https://doi.org/10.1109/PASSAT/SocialCom.2011.101
Doroud, Mina ; Bhattacharyya, Prantik ; Wu, S. Felix ; Felmlee, Diane Helen. / The evolution of ego-centric triads : A microscopic approach toward predicting macroscopic network properties. Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011. 2011. pp. 172-179 (Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011).
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Doroud, M, Bhattacharyya, P, Wu, SF & Felmlee, DH 2011, The evolution of ego-centric triads: A microscopic approach toward predicting macroscopic network properties. in Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011., 6113110, Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011, pp. 172-179, 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2011 and 2011 IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2011, Boston, MA, United States, 10/9/11. https://doi.org/10.1109/PASSAT/SocialCom.2011.101

The evolution of ego-centric triads : A microscopic approach toward predicting macroscopic network properties. / Doroud, Mina; Bhattacharyya, Prantik; Wu, S. Felix; Felmlee, Diane Helen.

Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011. 2011. p. 172-179 6113110 (Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Doroud M, Bhattacharyya P, Wu SF, Felmlee DH. The evolution of ego-centric triads: A microscopic approach toward predicting macroscopic network properties. In Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011. 2011. p. 172-179. 6113110. (Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011). https://doi.org/10.1109/PASSAT/SocialCom.2011.101