The family-school relation and the child's school performance.

D. L. Stevenson, David P. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

373 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a nationally representative sample of American households, we examine the relation between parental involvement in schooling and the child's school performance. With a sample of 179 children, parents, and teachers, we investigate 3 hypotheses: (1) the higher the educational status of the mother the greater the degree of parental involvement in school activities; (2) the younger the age of the child the greater the degree of parental involvement; and (3) children of parents who are more involved in school activities do better in school than children with parents who are less involved. In an analysis of cross-sectional data, we discover support for the 3 hypotheses. The educational status of the mother is related to the degree of parental involvement in schooling, so that parents with more education are more involved. Parental involvement is related to the child's school performance. Also, parents are more involved in school activities if the child is younger. The mother's educational level and the age of the child are stronger predictors of parental involvement in schooling for boys than for girls. We do not, however, find a direct effect of maternal educational status on school performance independent of parental involvement in school activities. We discuss these findings in light of the relation between families and schools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1348-1357
Number of pages10
JournalChild Development
Volume58
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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parents
school
performance
Parents
Educational Status
Mothers
schoolchild
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education
teacher
education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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The family-school relation and the child's school performance. / Stevenson, D. L.; Baker, David P.

In: Child Development, Vol. 58, No. 5, 01.01.1987, p. 1348-1357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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