The feeding behavior of Spumella sp. as a function of particle size

Implications for bacterial size in pelagic systems

Dale Arnold Holen, Martin E. Boraas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Direct observation was used to measure feeding rates of the flagellate Spumella on three sizes of bacteria plus 0.3 μm latex beads using video microscopy. Feeding rate was maximum on the intermediate-sized bacteria. Maximum ingestion rates (Im) for the large- (0.53 μm3), intermediate- (0.08 μm3) and small-sized (0.02 μm3) bacteria and 0.014 μm3 latex beads were 11, 38 and 14 bacteria and 9 beads flagellate-1 h-1, respectively. The growth rates of Spumella sp. feeding on monoxenic cultures of the large- vs. the intermediate-sized bacteria were indistinguishable but Spumella sp. could not sustain its population density when feeding on the small bacterium as the sole food source. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Spumella sp., and possibly other flagellate protozoa, tend to feed selectively on larger prey. One consequence of this hypothesis is that differential grazing by bactivores may select for small bacteria in natural waters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-88
Number of pages16
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume220
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1991

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Spumella
feeding behavior
particle size
bacterium
bacteria
flagellate
latex
monoxenic culture
ingestion rate
Protozoa
microscopy
population density
grazing
ingestion
food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

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The feeding behavior of Spumella sp. as a function of particle size : Implications for bacterial size in pelagic systems. / Holen, Dale Arnold; Boraas, Martin E.

In: Hydrobiologia, Vol. 220, No. 1, 01.08.1991, p. 73-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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