The Future of Sport Philosophy in Higher Education Kinesiology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Massengale’s Trends Toward the Future of Physical Education (1987) makes no reference to the existence of the philosophic inquiry of physical activity within higher education kinesiology programs—even though the sub-discipline had been formalized by academics in the early 1970s. In contrast, Massengale and Swanson’s The History of Exercise and Sport Science (1997) dedicated a chapter to sport philosophy’s development, including a prognosis of its future. Since then, there has been tremendous growth in the sub-discipline, including an increase in publication outlets, stand-alone monographs, and the creation of academic associations globally. Yet this growth has not necessarily secured sport philosophy’s place in higher education curriculum. In this article, we briefly review the history of philosophic inquiry into physical activity and review previous predictions of the sub-discipline’s future before offering our own prognostication of its future in higher education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-256
Number of pages17
JournalQuest
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2016

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Sports
education
prognostication
sports science
education curriculum
history
physical education
philosophy
trend

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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The Future of Sport Philosophy in Higher Education Kinesiology. / Hopsicker, Peter Matthew; Hochstetler, Douglas.

In: Quest, Vol. 68, No. 3, 02.07.2016, p. 240-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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