The good viruses: Viral mutualistic symbioses

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

240 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although viruses are most often studied as pathogens, many are beneficial to their hosts, providing essential functions in some cases and conditionally beneficial functions in others. Beneficial viruses have been discovered in many different hosts, including bacteria, insects, plants, fungi and animals. How these beneficial interactions evolve is still a mystery in many cases but, as discussed in this Review, the mechanisms of these interactions are beginning to be understood in more detail.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-108
Number of pages10
JournalNature Reviews Microbiology
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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Symbiosis
Viruses
Insects
Fungi
Bacteria

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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The good viruses : Viral mutualistic symbioses. / Roossinck, Marilyn J.

In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 99-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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