The haloacetic acid leap in effluent of a biologically active carbon filter experiencing a disinfectant switch

Wendong Wang, Yuefeng F. Xie, H. Larry Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Water utilities must disinfect their water despite the formation of carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) such as haloacetic acids (HAAs) upon chlorination. Although employment of a biologically active carbon (BAC) filtration process is able to reduce the HAA level preventively by removing the HAA precursors and correctively by removing the already-formed HAAs, this research reported an HAA leap in a bench-scale BAC filter effluent upon a disinfectant switch from chlorine to chloramine, posing a pressure of meeting the stringent HAA regulations. The HAA6 (sum of six HAAs) tripled from a 5 μg/L base level to a maximum of 17 μg/L during progressive switches with 3 chloramine doses at 5, 25, and 50 mg/L. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) accounted for the majority of the leap, which also influenced the bromine substitution factor during the HAA formation. Filtration of distilled water using heat-deactivated media evidenced slight HAA desorption and suggested potential roles of soluble microbial products from biofilms as new HAA precursors for a real BAC filter experiencing a disinfectant switch.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number125435
JournalChemosphere
Volume244
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2020

Fingerprint

Disinfectants
Effluents
Carbon
Switches
effluent
filter
Acids
acid
carbon
Water
Dichloroacetic Acid
Dichloroacetic acid
disinfectant
Bromine
Disinfection
Chlorination
Halogenation
Chlorine
Biofilms
bromine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

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abstract = "Water utilities must disinfect their water despite the formation of carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) such as haloacetic acids (HAAs) upon chlorination. Although employment of a biologically active carbon (BAC) filtration process is able to reduce the HAA level preventively by removing the HAA precursors and correctively by removing the already-formed HAAs, this research reported an HAA leap in a bench-scale BAC filter effluent upon a disinfectant switch from chlorine to chloramine, posing a pressure of meeting the stringent HAA regulations. The HAA6 (sum of six HAAs) tripled from a 5 μg/L base level to a maximum of 17 μg/L during progressive switches with 3 chloramine doses at 5, 25, and 50 mg/L. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) accounted for the majority of the leap, which also influenced the bromine substitution factor during the HAA formation. Filtration of distilled water using heat-deactivated media evidenced slight HAA desorption and suggested potential roles of soluble microbial products from biofilms as new HAA precursors for a real BAC filter experiencing a disinfectant switch.",
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The haloacetic acid leap in effluent of a biologically active carbon filter experiencing a disinfectant switch. / Wang, Wendong; Xie, Yuefeng F.; Tang, H. Larry.

In: Chemosphere, Vol. 244, 125435, 04.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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