The hierarchy of consumer participation and patterns of economic, social, and political participation

Drew Hyman, John Shingler, III

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines relationships between the hierarchy of consumer participation and propensities for general political and community participation. The results of an empirical study reveal how patterns of participation, knowledge seeking, and decision making are interrelated and deeply rooted in the sociopolitical culture. Cluster analysis reveals that economic, social, and political bias are cumulative in individuals, creating differential patterns in the American political culture resulting in a comparative advantage for some and a structural disadvantage for others. The findings have important implications for understanding behavior in democratic polities, market economic systems, political, economic, and social participation, citizen/consumer education and protection, and policymaking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-407
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Consumer Affairs
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

social participation
political participation
participation
consumer education
economics
consumer protection
political culture
economic system
cluster analysis
citizen
decision making
market
trend
community
Political economics
Participation
Economics
Political participation
Cluster analysis
Economic systems

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

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The hierarchy of consumer participation and patterns of economic, social, and political participation. / Hyman, Drew; Shingler, III, John.

In: Journal of Consumer Affairs, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.01.1999, p. 380-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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