The homeless use Facebook?! Similarities of social network use between college students and homeless young adults

Rosanna E. Guadagno, Nicole Lori Muscanell, David E. Pollio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research compared technology use among homeless young adults with that of college students as a means of understanding technology use among young adults today; people who have grown up with technology. Specifically, social network site (SNS) usage was assessed for two age-matched young adult samples, one drawn from a large introductory psychology subject pool, and a second from homeless young adults who were approached for participation when they entered metropolitan shelters. Overall, technology use was strikingly similar. These results call for a paradigm shift in researchers' understanding of technology use and indicate that contemporary young adults sampled across socio-economic class and varying ethnicities are far more similar than prior research would suggest. These results call into question whether the term "digital divide" is useful for describing group differences in technology use as our results suggest the divide has narrowed considerably.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-89
Number of pages4
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Social Support
Young Adult
Students
Technology
Research
College Students
Homeless
Social Networks
Young Adults
Facebook
Economics
Research Personnel
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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The homeless use Facebook?! Similarities of social network use between college students and homeless young adults. / Guadagno, Rosanna E.; Muscanell, Nicole Lori; Pollio, David E.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 86-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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