The Human Bone Collection of the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Hong Kong: History and description of cranial and postcranial skeletal remains

Fabio Savoldi, Carla Montalvao, Liuling Hui, Carl K.K. Leung, Nina G. Jablonski, James K.H. Tsoi, Michael M. Bornstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The present work describes the status and contents of The Human Bone Collection of the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Hong Kong. Materials and methods: The Collection originates from the 1980s and became officially established in 2017 for teaching and research purposes. Most of the Collection consists of unclaimed human remains of southern Chinese individuals exhumed from local cemeteries and donated to the Faculty in the last few decades. The demographic information was provided largely from burial records and forensic estimations. Since 2016, the Collection has undergone a process of reorganization into cranial and postcranial remains, followed by preservation procedures that included cleaning and classification. Results: The Collection currently consists of remains belonging to about 368 individuals (243 males, 54 females, 71 unknown), with ages ranging from 0.8 to 90 years (mean 57.4 years). It comprises cranial remains belonging to 260 individuals (169 males, 39 females, 52 unknown), and postcranial remains belonging to 248 individuals (180 males, 42 females, 26 unknown). The preservation status ranges from poor to good, with the cranial remains better preserved than the postcranial elements. For a large number of individuals, ear ossicles, soil samples, and other materials are also available. Discussion: The Collection is accessible to local and international institutions for teaching and research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718-730
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
Volume175
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy
  • Anthropology

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