The human microbiome in evolution

Emily R. Davenport, Jon G. Sanders, Se Jin Song, Katherine R. Amato, Andrew G. Clark, Rob Knight

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

The trillions of microbes living in the gut-the gut microbiota-play an important role in human biology and disease. While much has been done to explore its diversity, a full understanding of our microbiomes demands an evolutionary perspective. In this review, we compare microbiomes from human populations, placing them in the context of microbes from humanity's near and distant animal relatives. We discuss potential mechanisms to generate host-specific microbiome configurations and the consequences of disrupting those configurations. Finally, we propose that this broader phylogenetic perspective is useful for understanding the mechanisms underlying human-microbiome interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number127
JournalBMC Biology
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Structural Biology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physiology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Plant Science
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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  • Cite this

    Davenport, E. R., Sanders, J. G., Song, S. J., Amato, K. R., Clark, A. G., & Knight, R. (2017). The human microbiome in evolution. BMC Biology, 15(1), [127]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12915-017-0454-7