The Impact of Cross-Addiction on Information Sharing Behaviors on Social Networking Sites

Babajide Osatuyi, Star Roxanne Hiltz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a rise in the interest among researchers to understand how addiction to social networking sites (SNSs) influences the use of SNS for information sharing. Much less attention has been placed on the interactive effect of multiple addictions (i.e., cross-addiction) on information sharing behaviors on SNSs. In this study, we examine the interaction effect of SNS addiction and alcohol use on two characteristic sharing behaviors on SNSs, self-promotion, and peer promotion of alcohol use. This study contributes to theory and practice as it builds a model that integrates social cognitive theory and normative social influence to explain mechanisms through which cross-addiction shapes information sharing behaviors on SNSs. The proposed model is estimated using data from a sample of college students in a North American university. The results support the theorized relationships between cross-addiction and SNS use to promote addiction-related activities. Implications of the findings for theory and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-115
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Computer Information Systems
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2019

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addiction
networking
Alcohols
Students
promotion
alcohol
cognitive theory
university
interaction
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Information Systems
  • Education
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

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The Impact of Cross-Addiction on Information Sharing Behaviors on Social Networking Sites. / Osatuyi, Babajide; Hiltz, Star Roxanne.

In: Journal of Computer Information Systems, Vol. 59, No. 2, 04.03.2019, p. 105-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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