The impact of donor-recipient sex matching on survival after orthotopic heart transplantation: Analysis of 18 000 transplants in the modern era

Eric S. Weiss, Jeremiah G. Allen, Nishant D. Patel, Stuart D. Russell, William A. Baumgartner, Ashish S. Shah, John Conte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction-Single-institution series have suggested that men receiving orthotopic heart transplantation from female donors have decreased survival. No multi-institutional series has comprehensively addressed the issue of donor and recipient sex matching for both male and female orthotopic heart transplantation recipients. Methods and Results-We used data from the multi-institutional prospectively collected United Network for Organ Sharing open transplantation cohort to review 18 240 adult patients who received orthotopic heart transplantation from 1999 to 2007. Four donor recipient strata were identified (male donor/male recipient, N=10 750; female donor/female recipient, N=2201; male donor/female recipient, N=2121; and female donor/male recipient, N=3168). The primary end point of all cause posttransplant mortality was compared among groups using a Cox proportional hazard regression model with additional propensity adjustment. Female recipients, irrespective of donor sex, had 3.6% lower overall survival at 5 years posttransplant (P=0.003). Men who received organs from male donors had the highest cumulative survival at 5 years (74.5%). Men receiving female hearts had a 15% increase in the risk of adjusted cumulative mortality (hazard ratio, 1.15;95% CI, 1.02 to 1.30; P=0.02). No significant increase in the relative hazard for death occurred for women receiving opposite sex donor organs (1.24;0.92 to 1.35; P=0.31). Conclusions-The United Network for Organ Sharing data set has provided a large sample examining donor recipient sex pairing in orthotopic heart transplantation. Men receiving organs for same sex donors have significantly improved short-and long-term survival. No survival advantage was seen for women with same sex donors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-408
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation: Heart Failure
Volume2
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

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Heart Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Transplants
Survival
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Transplantation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Weiss, Eric S. ; Allen, Jeremiah G. ; Patel, Nishant D. ; Russell, Stuart D. ; Baumgartner, William A. ; Shah, Ashish S. ; Conte, John. / The impact of donor-recipient sex matching on survival after orthotopic heart transplantation : Analysis of 18 000 transplants in the modern era. In: Circulation: Heart Failure. 2009 ; Vol. 2, No. 5. pp. 401-408.
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title = "The impact of donor-recipient sex matching on survival after orthotopic heart transplantation: Analysis of 18 000 transplants in the modern era",
abstract = "Introduction-Single-institution series have suggested that men receiving orthotopic heart transplantation from female donors have decreased survival. No multi-institutional series has comprehensively addressed the issue of donor and recipient sex matching for both male and female orthotopic heart transplantation recipients. Methods and Results-We used data from the multi-institutional prospectively collected United Network for Organ Sharing open transplantation cohort to review 18 240 adult patients who received orthotopic heart transplantation from 1999 to 2007. Four donor recipient strata were identified (male donor/male recipient, N=10 750; female donor/female recipient, N=2201; male donor/female recipient, N=2121; and female donor/male recipient, N=3168). The primary end point of all cause posttransplant mortality was compared among groups using a Cox proportional hazard regression model with additional propensity adjustment. Female recipients, irrespective of donor sex, had 3.6{\%} lower overall survival at 5 years posttransplant (P=0.003). Men who received organs from male donors had the highest cumulative survival at 5 years (74.5{\%}). Men receiving female hearts had a 15{\%} increase in the risk of adjusted cumulative mortality (hazard ratio, 1.15;95{\%} CI, 1.02 to 1.30; P=0.02). No significant increase in the relative hazard for death occurred for women receiving opposite sex donor organs (1.24;0.92 to 1.35; P=0.31). Conclusions-The United Network for Organ Sharing data set has provided a large sample examining donor recipient sex pairing in orthotopic heart transplantation. Men receiving organs for same sex donors have significantly improved short-and long-term survival. No survival advantage was seen for women with same sex donors.",
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The impact of donor-recipient sex matching on survival after orthotopic heart transplantation : Analysis of 18 000 transplants in the modern era. / Weiss, Eric S.; Allen, Jeremiah G.; Patel, Nishant D.; Russell, Stuart D.; Baumgartner, William A.; Shah, Ashish S.; Conte, John.

In: Circulation: Heart Failure, Vol. 2, No. 5, 01.09.2009, p. 401-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The impact of donor-recipient sex matching on survival after orthotopic heart transplantation

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AU - Weiss, Eric S.

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AU - Conte, John

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N2 - Introduction-Single-institution series have suggested that men receiving orthotopic heart transplantation from female donors have decreased survival. No multi-institutional series has comprehensively addressed the issue of donor and recipient sex matching for both male and female orthotopic heart transplantation recipients. Methods and Results-We used data from the multi-institutional prospectively collected United Network for Organ Sharing open transplantation cohort to review 18 240 adult patients who received orthotopic heart transplantation from 1999 to 2007. Four donor recipient strata were identified (male donor/male recipient, N=10 750; female donor/female recipient, N=2201; male donor/female recipient, N=2121; and female donor/male recipient, N=3168). The primary end point of all cause posttransplant mortality was compared among groups using a Cox proportional hazard regression model with additional propensity adjustment. Female recipients, irrespective of donor sex, had 3.6% lower overall survival at 5 years posttransplant (P=0.003). Men who received organs from male donors had the highest cumulative survival at 5 years (74.5%). Men receiving female hearts had a 15% increase in the risk of adjusted cumulative mortality (hazard ratio, 1.15;95% CI, 1.02 to 1.30; P=0.02). No significant increase in the relative hazard for death occurred for women receiving opposite sex donor organs (1.24;0.92 to 1.35; P=0.31). Conclusions-The United Network for Organ Sharing data set has provided a large sample examining donor recipient sex pairing in orthotopic heart transplantation. Men receiving organs for same sex donors have significantly improved short-and long-term survival. No survival advantage was seen for women with same sex donors.

AB - Introduction-Single-institution series have suggested that men receiving orthotopic heart transplantation from female donors have decreased survival. No multi-institutional series has comprehensively addressed the issue of donor and recipient sex matching for both male and female orthotopic heart transplantation recipients. Methods and Results-We used data from the multi-institutional prospectively collected United Network for Organ Sharing open transplantation cohort to review 18 240 adult patients who received orthotopic heart transplantation from 1999 to 2007. Four donor recipient strata were identified (male donor/male recipient, N=10 750; female donor/female recipient, N=2201; male donor/female recipient, N=2121; and female donor/male recipient, N=3168). The primary end point of all cause posttransplant mortality was compared among groups using a Cox proportional hazard regression model with additional propensity adjustment. Female recipients, irrespective of donor sex, had 3.6% lower overall survival at 5 years posttransplant (P=0.003). Men who received organs from male donors had the highest cumulative survival at 5 years (74.5%). Men receiving female hearts had a 15% increase in the risk of adjusted cumulative mortality (hazard ratio, 1.15;95% CI, 1.02 to 1.30; P=0.02). No significant increase in the relative hazard for death occurred for women receiving opposite sex donor organs (1.24;0.92 to 1.35; P=0.31). Conclusions-The United Network for Organ Sharing data set has provided a large sample examining donor recipient sex pairing in orthotopic heart transplantation. Men receiving organs for same sex donors have significantly improved short-and long-term survival. No survival advantage was seen for women with same sex donors.

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