The impact of mental health disorders on 30-day readmission after bariatric surgery

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Abstract

Background: Mental health disorders are common among bariatric surgery patients. Mental health disorders, particularly depression, have been associated with poorer surgical outcomes, indicating the bariatric surgery patient population warrants special clinical attention. Objective: Our study sought to examine the effect of diagnosed mental health disorders on 30-day readmission for those undergoing bariatric surgery in hospitals across Pennsylvania from 2011 to 2014. Methods: We used Pennsylvania Healthcare Cost Containment Council data to perform this analysis. Inclusion criteria encompassed patients aged>18 years who underwent bariatric surgery at any hospital or freestanding surgical facility in Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2014. Mental health disorders were identified using predetermined International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision codes. Logistic regression was used to model the risk of 30-day readmission and estimate the effect of mental health disorders on 30-day readmission. Results: Of the 19,259 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, 40.3% had a diagnosed mental health disorder; 6.51% of all patients were readmitted within 30 days. Patients with a diagnosed mental health disorder had 34% greater odds of readmission (odds ratio = 1.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.19–1.51) relative to patients with no diagnosed mental health disorder. Patients with major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder had 46% greater odds of being readmitted compared with patients with no major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder diagnosis. Conclusion: Study findings imply the need for risk assessment of patients before postoperative discharge. Given that patients with mental health diagnoses are at increased risk of 30-day readmission after bariatric surgery, they may benefit from additional discharge interventions designed to attenuate potential readmissions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-331
Number of pages7
JournalSurgery for Obesity and Related Diseases
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Bariatric Surgery
Mental Disorders
Mental Health
Major Depressive Disorder
Bipolar Disorder
Needs Assessment
Cost Control
International Classification of Diseases
Health Care Costs
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "The impact of mental health disorders on 30-day readmission after bariatric surgery",
abstract = "Background: Mental health disorders are common among bariatric surgery patients. Mental health disorders, particularly depression, have been associated with poorer surgical outcomes, indicating the bariatric surgery patient population warrants special clinical attention. Objective: Our study sought to examine the effect of diagnosed mental health disorders on 30-day readmission for those undergoing bariatric surgery in hospitals across Pennsylvania from 2011 to 2014. Methods: We used Pennsylvania Healthcare Cost Containment Council data to perform this analysis. Inclusion criteria encompassed patients aged>18 years who underwent bariatric surgery at any hospital or freestanding surgical facility in Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2014. Mental health disorders were identified using predetermined International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision codes. Logistic regression was used to model the risk of 30-day readmission and estimate the effect of mental health disorders on 30-day readmission. Results: Of the 19,259 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, 40.3{\%} had a diagnosed mental health disorder; 6.51{\%} of all patients were readmitted within 30 days. Patients with a diagnosed mental health disorder had 34{\%} greater odds of readmission (odds ratio = 1.34, 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.19–1.51) relative to patients with no diagnosed mental health disorder. Patients with major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder had 46{\%} greater odds of being readmitted compared with patients with no major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder diagnosis. Conclusion: Study findings imply the need for risk assessment of patients before postoperative discharge. Given that patients with mental health diagnoses are at increased risk of 30-day readmission after bariatric surgery, they may benefit from additional discharge interventions designed to attenuate potential readmissions.",
author = "Megan Litz and Andrea Rigby and Ann Rogers and Douglas Leslie and Hollenbeak, {Christopher S.}",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - The impact of mental health disorders on 30-day readmission after bariatric surgery

AU - Litz, Megan

AU - Rigby, Andrea

AU - Rogers, Ann

AU - Leslie, Douglas

AU - Hollenbeak, Christopher S.

PY - 2018/3/1

Y1 - 2018/3/1

N2 - Background: Mental health disorders are common among bariatric surgery patients. Mental health disorders, particularly depression, have been associated with poorer surgical outcomes, indicating the bariatric surgery patient population warrants special clinical attention. Objective: Our study sought to examine the effect of diagnosed mental health disorders on 30-day readmission for those undergoing bariatric surgery in hospitals across Pennsylvania from 2011 to 2014. Methods: We used Pennsylvania Healthcare Cost Containment Council data to perform this analysis. Inclusion criteria encompassed patients aged>18 years who underwent bariatric surgery at any hospital or freestanding surgical facility in Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2014. Mental health disorders were identified using predetermined International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision codes. Logistic regression was used to model the risk of 30-day readmission and estimate the effect of mental health disorders on 30-day readmission. Results: Of the 19,259 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, 40.3% had a diagnosed mental health disorder; 6.51% of all patients were readmitted within 30 days. Patients with a diagnosed mental health disorder had 34% greater odds of readmission (odds ratio = 1.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.19–1.51) relative to patients with no diagnosed mental health disorder. Patients with major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder had 46% greater odds of being readmitted compared with patients with no major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder diagnosis. Conclusion: Study findings imply the need for risk assessment of patients before postoperative discharge. Given that patients with mental health diagnoses are at increased risk of 30-day readmission after bariatric surgery, they may benefit from additional discharge interventions designed to attenuate potential readmissions.

AB - Background: Mental health disorders are common among bariatric surgery patients. Mental health disorders, particularly depression, have been associated with poorer surgical outcomes, indicating the bariatric surgery patient population warrants special clinical attention. Objective: Our study sought to examine the effect of diagnosed mental health disorders on 30-day readmission for those undergoing bariatric surgery in hospitals across Pennsylvania from 2011 to 2014. Methods: We used Pennsylvania Healthcare Cost Containment Council data to perform this analysis. Inclusion criteria encompassed patients aged>18 years who underwent bariatric surgery at any hospital or freestanding surgical facility in Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2014. Mental health disorders were identified using predetermined International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision codes. Logistic regression was used to model the risk of 30-day readmission and estimate the effect of mental health disorders on 30-day readmission. Results: Of the 19,259 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, 40.3% had a diagnosed mental health disorder; 6.51% of all patients were readmitted within 30 days. Patients with a diagnosed mental health disorder had 34% greater odds of readmission (odds ratio = 1.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.19–1.51) relative to patients with no diagnosed mental health disorder. Patients with major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder had 46% greater odds of being readmitted compared with patients with no major depressive disorder/bipolar disorder diagnosis. Conclusion: Study findings imply the need for risk assessment of patients before postoperative discharge. Given that patients with mental health diagnoses are at increased risk of 30-day readmission after bariatric surgery, they may benefit from additional discharge interventions designed to attenuate potential readmissions.

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